The dimensions of auditory hallucination in schizophrenia

Association with depressive symptoms and quality of life

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Auditory hallucination (AH) is often unexplored in depth in clinical practice. This study sought to ascertain the relationship between AH, depressive symptoms and quality of life (QOL) and its association with socio-demographic and clinical variables. Methods: This was a cross sectional study done in a psychiatry unit involving 60 schizophrenic patients between 18 to 60 years old. Psychotic Symptom Rating Scale - Auditory Hallucination subscale (PSYRATS-AH), Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) and World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief scale (WHOQOL-BREF) were used as instruments. Results: Alcohol intake was found to be significantly associated with the severity of AH. A significant moderate positive correlation was found between AH total score and CDSS (r=0.53, p < 0.001) and moderately high correlation between emotional characteristics subscale with CDSS (r=0.651, p < 0.005).The PSYRATS-AH dimensions; amount of distress (r=0.721, p < 0.001) and intensity of distress (r=0.757, p < 0.001) showed significant high correlation with CDSS. As for QOL, frequency of AH (r=-0.419, p < 0.01) and CDSS (r=- 0.435, p < 0.01) showed significant moderate negative correlation, while duration, loudness, amount and intensity of distress, disruption to life and controllability of voices had significant fair correlation with QOL. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the frequency of AH (p=0.047), controllability of AH (p=0.027) and depressive symptoms (p=0.001) significantly predict QOL. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that each dimension of AH had different contributions towards depressive symptoms and the QOL in patients with schizophrenia. Therefore, appropriate treatment focusing on the specific dimension of AH not only may reduce depressive symptoms, but may also improve QOL of these patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-64
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Medical Journal Malaysia
Volume16
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

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Hallucinations
Schizophrenia
Quality of Life
Depression
Psychiatry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Alcohols
Demography

Keywords

  • Auditory hallucination
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Quality of life
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{7b8c4e6e56b54706851d24f3110a37fc,
title = "The dimensions of auditory hallucination in schizophrenia: Association with depressive symptoms and quality of life",
abstract = "Introduction: Auditory hallucination (AH) is often unexplored in depth in clinical practice. This study sought to ascertain the relationship between AH, depressive symptoms and quality of life (QOL) and its association with socio-demographic and clinical variables. Methods: This was a cross sectional study done in a psychiatry unit involving 60 schizophrenic patients between 18 to 60 years old. Psychotic Symptom Rating Scale - Auditory Hallucination subscale (PSYRATS-AH), Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) and World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief scale (WHOQOL-BREF) were used as instruments. Results: Alcohol intake was found to be significantly associated with the severity of AH. A significant moderate positive correlation was found between AH total score and CDSS (r=0.53, p < 0.001) and moderately high correlation between emotional characteristics subscale with CDSS (r=0.651, p < 0.005).The PSYRATS-AH dimensions; amount of distress (r=0.721, p < 0.001) and intensity of distress (r=0.757, p < 0.001) showed significant high correlation with CDSS. As for QOL, frequency of AH (r=-0.419, p < 0.01) and CDSS (r=- 0.435, p < 0.01) showed significant moderate negative correlation, while duration, loudness, amount and intensity of distress, disruption to life and controllability of voices had significant fair correlation with QOL. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the frequency of AH (p=0.047), controllability of AH (p=0.027) and depressive symptoms (p=0.001) significantly predict QOL. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that each dimension of AH had different contributions towards depressive symptoms and the QOL in patients with schizophrenia. Therefore, appropriate treatment focusing on the specific dimension of AH not only may reduce depressive symptoms, but may also improve QOL of these patients.",
keywords = "Auditory hallucination, Depressive symptoms, Quality of life, Schizophrenia",
author = "V. Janaki and Suzaily Wahab and {Abdul Rahman}, {Abdul Hamid} and Hazli Zakaria and {Mohammed Nawi}, Azmawati",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
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language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "55--64",
journal = "International Medical Journal Malaysia",
issn = "1823-4631",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - The dimensions of auditory hallucination in schizophrenia

T2 - Association with depressive symptoms and quality of life

AU - Janaki, V.

AU - Wahab, Suzaily

AU - Abdul Rahman, Abdul Hamid

AU - Zakaria, Hazli

AU - Mohammed Nawi, Azmawati

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Introduction: Auditory hallucination (AH) is often unexplored in depth in clinical practice. This study sought to ascertain the relationship between AH, depressive symptoms and quality of life (QOL) and its association with socio-demographic and clinical variables. Methods: This was a cross sectional study done in a psychiatry unit involving 60 schizophrenic patients between 18 to 60 years old. Psychotic Symptom Rating Scale - Auditory Hallucination subscale (PSYRATS-AH), Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) and World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief scale (WHOQOL-BREF) were used as instruments. Results: Alcohol intake was found to be significantly associated with the severity of AH. A significant moderate positive correlation was found between AH total score and CDSS (r=0.53, p < 0.001) and moderately high correlation between emotional characteristics subscale with CDSS (r=0.651, p < 0.005).The PSYRATS-AH dimensions; amount of distress (r=0.721, p < 0.001) and intensity of distress (r=0.757, p < 0.001) showed significant high correlation with CDSS. As for QOL, frequency of AH (r=-0.419, p < 0.01) and CDSS (r=- 0.435, p < 0.01) showed significant moderate negative correlation, while duration, loudness, amount and intensity of distress, disruption to life and controllability of voices had significant fair correlation with QOL. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the frequency of AH (p=0.047), controllability of AH (p=0.027) and depressive symptoms (p=0.001) significantly predict QOL. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that each dimension of AH had different contributions towards depressive symptoms and the QOL in patients with schizophrenia. Therefore, appropriate treatment focusing on the specific dimension of AH not only may reduce depressive symptoms, but may also improve QOL of these patients.

AB - Introduction: Auditory hallucination (AH) is often unexplored in depth in clinical practice. This study sought to ascertain the relationship between AH, depressive symptoms and quality of life (QOL) and its association with socio-demographic and clinical variables. Methods: This was a cross sectional study done in a psychiatry unit involving 60 schizophrenic patients between 18 to 60 years old. Psychotic Symptom Rating Scale - Auditory Hallucination subscale (PSYRATS-AH), Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) and World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief scale (WHOQOL-BREF) were used as instruments. Results: Alcohol intake was found to be significantly associated with the severity of AH. A significant moderate positive correlation was found between AH total score and CDSS (r=0.53, p < 0.001) and moderately high correlation between emotional characteristics subscale with CDSS (r=0.651, p < 0.005).The PSYRATS-AH dimensions; amount of distress (r=0.721, p < 0.001) and intensity of distress (r=0.757, p < 0.001) showed significant high correlation with CDSS. As for QOL, frequency of AH (r=-0.419, p < 0.01) and CDSS (r=- 0.435, p < 0.01) showed significant moderate negative correlation, while duration, loudness, amount and intensity of distress, disruption to life and controllability of voices had significant fair correlation with QOL. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the frequency of AH (p=0.047), controllability of AH (p=0.027) and depressive symptoms (p=0.001) significantly predict QOL. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that each dimension of AH had different contributions towards depressive symptoms and the QOL in patients with schizophrenia. Therefore, appropriate treatment focusing on the specific dimension of AH not only may reduce depressive symptoms, but may also improve QOL of these patients.

KW - Auditory hallucination

KW - Depressive symptoms

KW - Quality of life

KW - Schizophrenia

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