The composition of surfactants in river water and its influence to the amount of surfactants in drinking water

Norfazrin Mohd Hanif, Siti Nurul Nadiah Adnan, Mohd Talib Latif, Zuriati Zakaria, Md Pauzi Abdullahand, Mohamed Rozali Othman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ubiquitous distribution of surfactants in water particularly drinking water was reported to have variable potential for bioaccumulation which can lead to toxicity in the human system. In this study, the concentration of surfactants in untreated water (surface water of rivers) and respective treated water (tap and drinking water) were determined. Comparisons were made between surfactants found in surface water in both seasons e.g. dry and rainy season. Samples were analysed by colorimetric method as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) for anionic surfactant and disulphine blue active substances (DBAS) for cationic surfactant. The absorbance of the analytes were measured using UV-Vis Spectrophotometer at 650 nm and 628 nm, respectively. The results obtained showed that the concentration of surfactants was significantly high during dry season in both untreated waters. It was also found that rivers at the vicinity of town areas contained higher amount of cationic surfactants in both seasons (rainy = 0.20±0.21μmolL• 1, dry = 0.54 ±0.15μmolL• 1), while residential areas showed the highest concentration of anionic surfactants (rainy = 0.34±0.20μmolL• 1, dry = 0.86 ±0.40μmolL• 1). The high amount of surfactants is attributed to the anthropogenic sources generated by human activities. In contrast, the concentration of surfactants in treated water was dominated by DBAS (drinking water= 0.26±0.29μmolL• 1, tank water = 0.45±0.43μmolL• 1), indicating that the treatment process might influence the rising amount of DBAS in treated water. As a whole, the concentration of surfactants found in drinking water decreased compared to the concentration of the corresponding water samples along the rivers studied. This phenomenon indicates that the treatment processes for drinking water production have been shown to be insufficient for the complete removal of surfactants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)970-975
Number of pages6
JournalWorld Applied Sciences Journal
Volume17
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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surfactant
river water
drinking water
water
dry season
river
surface water
anthropogenic source
absorbance
bioaccumulation
human activity
toxicity

Keywords

  • Anthropogenic sources
  • Treated and untreated water
  • Water resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

The composition of surfactants in river water and its influence to the amount of surfactants in drinking water. / Hanif, Norfazrin Mohd; Adnan, Siti Nurul Nadiah; Latif, Mohd Talib; Zakaria, Zuriati; Abdullahand, Md Pauzi; Othman, Mohamed Rozali.

In: World Applied Sciences Journal, Vol. 17, No. 8, 2012, p. 970-975.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hanif, Norfazrin Mohd ; Adnan, Siti Nurul Nadiah ; Latif, Mohd Talib ; Zakaria, Zuriati ; Abdullahand, Md Pauzi ; Othman, Mohamed Rozali. / The composition of surfactants in river water and its influence to the amount of surfactants in drinking water. In: World Applied Sciences Journal. 2012 ; Vol. 17, No. 8. pp. 970-975.
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AB - The ubiquitous distribution of surfactants in water particularly drinking water was reported to have variable potential for bioaccumulation which can lead to toxicity in the human system. In this study, the concentration of surfactants in untreated water (surface water of rivers) and respective treated water (tap and drinking water) were determined. Comparisons were made between surfactants found in surface water in both seasons e.g. dry and rainy season. Samples were analysed by colorimetric method as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) for anionic surfactant and disulphine blue active substances (DBAS) for cationic surfactant. The absorbance of the analytes were measured using UV-Vis Spectrophotometer at 650 nm and 628 nm, respectively. The results obtained showed that the concentration of surfactants was significantly high during dry season in both untreated waters. It was also found that rivers at the vicinity of town areas contained higher amount of cationic surfactants in both seasons (rainy = 0.20±0.21μmolL• 1, dry = 0.54 ±0.15μmolL• 1), while residential areas showed the highest concentration of anionic surfactants (rainy = 0.34±0.20μmolL• 1, dry = 0.86 ±0.40μmolL• 1). The high amount of surfactants is attributed to the anthropogenic sources generated by human activities. In contrast, the concentration of surfactants in treated water was dominated by DBAS (drinking water= 0.26±0.29μmolL• 1, tank water = 0.45±0.43μmolL• 1), indicating that the treatment process might influence the rising amount of DBAS in treated water. As a whole, the concentration of surfactants found in drinking water decreased compared to the concentration of the corresponding water samples along the rivers studied. This phenomenon indicates that the treatment processes for drinking water production have been shown to be insufficient for the complete removal of surfactants.

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