The Clinical Significance of Vitamin D in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Systematic Review

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Vitamin D deficiency is more prevalent among SLE patients than the general population. Over the past decade, many studies across the globe have been carried out to investigate the role of vitamin D in SLE from various clinical angles. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review is to summarise and evaluate the evidence from the published literature; focusing on the clinical significance of vitamin D in SLE. Methods: The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Knowledge and CINAHL, using the terms "lupus", "systemic lupus erythematosus", "SLE and "vitamin D". We included only adult human studies published in the English language between 2000 and 2012.The reference lists of included studies were thoroughly reviewed in search for other relevant studies. Results: A total of 22 studies met the selection criteria. The majority of the studies were observational (95.5%) and cross sectional (90.9%). Out of the 15 studies which looked into the association between vitamin D and SLE disease activity, 10 studies (including the 3 largest studies in this series) revealed a statistically significant inverse relationship. For disease damage, on the other hand, 5 out of 6 studies failed to demonstrate any association with vitamin D levels. Cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia were related to vitamin D deficiency, according to 3 of the studies. Conclusion: There is convincing evidence to support the association between vitamin D levels and SLE disease activity. There is paucity of data in other clinical aspects to make firm conclusions.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere55275
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jan 2013

Fingerprint

lupus erythematosus
systematic review
vitamin D
Vitamin D
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
vitamin D deficiency
Vitamin D Deficiency
hypercholesterolemia
Hypercholesterolemia
selection criteria
insulin resistance
MEDLINE
Patient Selection
hypertension
Observational Studies
Insulin Resistance
Language
risk factors
Databases
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The Clinical Significance of Vitamin D in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus : A Systematic Review. / Rajalingham, Sakthiswary; Ali, Raymond Azman.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 1, e55275, 30.01.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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