The association between parent diet quality and child dietary patterns in nine- to eleven-year-old children from Dunedin, New Zealand

Brittany Davison, Pouya Saeedi, Katherine Black, Harriet Harrex, Jillian Haszard, Kim Meredith-Jones, Robin Quigg, Sheila Skeaff, Lee Stoner, Jyh Eiin Wong, Paula Skidmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research investigating the relationship between parents’ and children’s diets has focused on single foods or nutrients, and not on global diet, which may be more important for good health. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between parental diet quality and child dietary patterns. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 17 primary schools in Dunedin, New Zealand. Information on food consumption and related factors in children and their primary caregiver/parent were collected. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate dietary patterns in children and diet quality index (DQI) scores were calculated in parents. Relationships between parental DQI and child dietary patterns were examined in 401 child-parent pairs using mixed regression models. PCA generated two patterns; ‘Fruit and Vegetables’ and ‘Snacks’. A one unit higher parental DQI score was associated with a 0.03SD (CI: 0.02, 0.04) lower child ‘Snacks’ score. There was no significant relationship between ‘Fruit and Vegetables’ score and parental diet quality. Higher parental diet quality was associated with a lower dietary pattern score in children that was characterised by a lower consumption frequency of confectionery, chocolate, cakes, biscuits and savoury snacks. These results highlight the importance of parental modelling, in terms of their dietary choices, on the diet of children.

Original languageEnglish
Article number483
JournalNutrients
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 May 2017

Fingerprint

nutritional adequacy
New Zealand
eating habits
Diet
Snacks
snacks
Principal Component Analysis
Food
Vegetables
principal component analysis
vegetables
Fruit
diet
Parents
savory
Satureja
caregivers
fruits
elementary schools
biscuits

Keywords

  • Children
  • Diet quality
  • Dietary patterns
  • Parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Davison, B., Saeedi, P., Black, K., Harrex, H., Haszard, J., Meredith-Jones, K., ... Skidmore, P. (2017). The association between parent diet quality and child dietary patterns in nine- to eleven-year-old children from Dunedin, New Zealand. Nutrients, 9(5), [483]. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9050483

The association between parent diet quality and child dietary patterns in nine- to eleven-year-old children from Dunedin, New Zealand. / Davison, Brittany; Saeedi, Pouya; Black, Katherine; Harrex, Harriet; Haszard, Jillian; Meredith-Jones, Kim; Quigg, Robin; Skeaff, Sheila; Stoner, Lee; Wong, Jyh Eiin; Skidmore, Paula.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 9, No. 5, 483, 11.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davison, B, Saeedi, P, Black, K, Harrex, H, Haszard, J, Meredith-Jones, K, Quigg, R, Skeaff, S, Stoner, L, Wong, JE & Skidmore, P 2017, 'The association between parent diet quality and child dietary patterns in nine- to eleven-year-old children from Dunedin, New Zealand', Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 5, 483. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9050483
Davison, Brittany ; Saeedi, Pouya ; Black, Katherine ; Harrex, Harriet ; Haszard, Jillian ; Meredith-Jones, Kim ; Quigg, Robin ; Skeaff, Sheila ; Stoner, Lee ; Wong, Jyh Eiin ; Skidmore, Paula. / The association between parent diet quality and child dietary patterns in nine- to eleven-year-old children from Dunedin, New Zealand. In: Nutrients. 2017 ; Vol. 9, No. 5.
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