The architecture of risk for type 2 diabetes

Understanding asia in the context of global findings

Noraidatulakma Abdullah @ Muda, John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rodney J. Scott, Elizabeth G. Holliday

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes is rising rapidly in both developed and developing countries. Asia is developing as the epicentre of the escalating pandemic, reflecting rapid transitions in demography, migration, diet, and lifestyle patterns. The effective management of Type 2 diabetes in Asia may be complicated by differences in prevalence, risk factor profiles, genetic risk allele frequencies, and gene-environment interactions between different Asian countries, and between Asian and other continental populations. To reduce the worldwide burden of T2D, it will be important to understand the architecture of T2D susceptibility both within and between populations. This review will provide an overview of known genetic and nongenetic risk factors for T2D, placing the results from Asian studies in the context of broader global research. Given recent evidence from large-scale genetic studies of T2D, we place special emphasis on emerging knowledge about the genetic architecture of T2D and the potential contribution of genetic effects to population differences in risk.

Original languageEnglish
Article number593982
JournalInternational Journal of Endocrinology
Volume2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Population
Gene-Environment Interaction
Pandemics
Developed Countries
Gene Frequency
Developing Countries
Life Style
Demography
Diet
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

The architecture of risk for type 2 diabetes : Understanding asia in the context of global findings. / Abdullah @ Muda, Noraidatulakma; Attia, John; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Scott, Rodney J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.

In: International Journal of Endocrinology, Vol. 2014, 593982, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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