Telomerase activation and human papillomavirus infection in invasive uterine cervical carcinoma in a set of Malaysian patients

P. L. Cheah, L. M. Looi, Min Hwei Ng, V. Sivanesaratnam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Telomerase activity was studied in invasive uterine cervical carcinoma to assess whether it was activated during cervical malignant transformation and to look for a possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a set of Malaysian patients. Methods: Histologically confirmed invasive cervical carcinoma and benign cervices were assayed for telomerase activity using a commercial telomerase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kit. The same cases were subjected to PCR detection of HPV using type specific (HPV types 6b, 11, 16, and 18) followed by L1 open reading frame (ORF) consensus primers. Results: HPV was detected in 18 (13 HPV-16, one HPV-6b, four only L1 ORF) of 20 invasive cervical carcinoma and one (only L1 ORF) of 19 benign cervices. Raised telomerase activity (A450 nm > 0.215) was detected in 11 cervical carcinomas, with A450 nm ranging between 0.238 and 21.790 (mean, 3.952) in positive squamous carcinomas, whereas A450 nm was only 0.222 in the one positive adenosquamous carcinoma. Five of 11 cervical carcinomas in stage I, three of six in stage II, both in stage III, and the only case in stage IV showed telomerase activation. Increased telomerase activity was noted in five of the 12 lymph node negative, five of the seven lymph node status unknown cases, and the one case with presumed lymph node metastasis. Ten of 18 HPV positive and one of two HPV negative cervical carcinomas showed telomerase upregulation. Conclusions: Telomerase is activated in invasive cervical carcinoma. Although larger studies are needed, there seems to be no clear association between telomerase upregulation and HPV status, although there is a suggestion of increased telomerase activity in squamous carcinomas and late stage disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-26
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Pathology
Volume55
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Papillomavirus Infections
Telomerase
Carcinoma
Open Reading Frames
Lymph Nodes
Cervix Uteri
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Up-Regulation
Adenosquamous Carcinoma
Human papillomavirus 11
Human papillomavirus 18
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Human papillomavirus 16
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Neoplasm Metastasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Telomerase activation and human papillomavirus infection in invasive uterine cervical carcinoma in a set of Malaysian patients. / Cheah, P. L.; Looi, L. M.; Ng, Min Hwei; Sivanesaratnam, V.

In: Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 55, No. 1, 2002, p. 22-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{42592c39301f48a897f16f1ad5f95df7,
title = "Telomerase activation and human papillomavirus infection in invasive uterine cervical carcinoma in a set of Malaysian patients",
abstract = "Aim: Telomerase activity was studied in invasive uterine cervical carcinoma to assess whether it was activated during cervical malignant transformation and to look for a possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a set of Malaysian patients. Methods: Histologically confirmed invasive cervical carcinoma and benign cervices were assayed for telomerase activity using a commercial telomerase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kit. The same cases were subjected to PCR detection of HPV using type specific (HPV types 6b, 11, 16, and 18) followed by L1 open reading frame (ORF) consensus primers. Results: HPV was detected in 18 (13 HPV-16, one HPV-6b, four only L1 ORF) of 20 invasive cervical carcinoma and one (only L1 ORF) of 19 benign cervices. Raised telomerase activity (A450 nm > 0.215) was detected in 11 cervical carcinomas, with A450 nm ranging between 0.238 and 21.790 (mean, 3.952) in positive squamous carcinomas, whereas A450 nm was only 0.222 in the one positive adenosquamous carcinoma. Five of 11 cervical carcinomas in stage I, three of six in stage II, both in stage III, and the only case in stage IV showed telomerase activation. Increased telomerase activity was noted in five of the 12 lymph node negative, five of the seven lymph node status unknown cases, and the one case with presumed lymph node metastasis. Ten of 18 HPV positive and one of two HPV negative cervical carcinomas showed telomerase upregulation. Conclusions: Telomerase is activated in invasive cervical carcinoma. Although larger studies are needed, there seems to be no clear association between telomerase upregulation and HPV status, although there is a suggestion of increased telomerase activity in squamous carcinomas and late stage disease.",
author = "Cheah, {P. L.} and Looi, {L. M.} and Ng, {Min Hwei} and V. Sivanesaratnam",
year = "2002",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "22--26",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Pathology - Clinical Molecular Pathology",
issn = "0021-9746",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Telomerase activation and human papillomavirus infection in invasive uterine cervical carcinoma in a set of Malaysian patients

AU - Cheah, P. L.

AU - Looi, L. M.

AU - Ng, Min Hwei

AU - Sivanesaratnam, V.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Aim: Telomerase activity was studied in invasive uterine cervical carcinoma to assess whether it was activated during cervical malignant transformation and to look for a possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a set of Malaysian patients. Methods: Histologically confirmed invasive cervical carcinoma and benign cervices were assayed for telomerase activity using a commercial telomerase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kit. The same cases were subjected to PCR detection of HPV using type specific (HPV types 6b, 11, 16, and 18) followed by L1 open reading frame (ORF) consensus primers. Results: HPV was detected in 18 (13 HPV-16, one HPV-6b, four only L1 ORF) of 20 invasive cervical carcinoma and one (only L1 ORF) of 19 benign cervices. Raised telomerase activity (A450 nm > 0.215) was detected in 11 cervical carcinomas, with A450 nm ranging between 0.238 and 21.790 (mean, 3.952) in positive squamous carcinomas, whereas A450 nm was only 0.222 in the one positive adenosquamous carcinoma. Five of 11 cervical carcinomas in stage I, three of six in stage II, both in stage III, and the only case in stage IV showed telomerase activation. Increased telomerase activity was noted in five of the 12 lymph node negative, five of the seven lymph node status unknown cases, and the one case with presumed lymph node metastasis. Ten of 18 HPV positive and one of two HPV negative cervical carcinomas showed telomerase upregulation. Conclusions: Telomerase is activated in invasive cervical carcinoma. Although larger studies are needed, there seems to be no clear association between telomerase upregulation and HPV status, although there is a suggestion of increased telomerase activity in squamous carcinomas and late stage disease.

AB - Aim: Telomerase activity was studied in invasive uterine cervical carcinoma to assess whether it was activated during cervical malignant transformation and to look for a possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a set of Malaysian patients. Methods: Histologically confirmed invasive cervical carcinoma and benign cervices were assayed for telomerase activity using a commercial telomerase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kit. The same cases were subjected to PCR detection of HPV using type specific (HPV types 6b, 11, 16, and 18) followed by L1 open reading frame (ORF) consensus primers. Results: HPV was detected in 18 (13 HPV-16, one HPV-6b, four only L1 ORF) of 20 invasive cervical carcinoma and one (only L1 ORF) of 19 benign cervices. Raised telomerase activity (A450 nm > 0.215) was detected in 11 cervical carcinomas, with A450 nm ranging between 0.238 and 21.790 (mean, 3.952) in positive squamous carcinomas, whereas A450 nm was only 0.222 in the one positive adenosquamous carcinoma. Five of 11 cervical carcinomas in stage I, three of six in stage II, both in stage III, and the only case in stage IV showed telomerase activation. Increased telomerase activity was noted in five of the 12 lymph node negative, five of the seven lymph node status unknown cases, and the one case with presumed lymph node metastasis. Ten of 18 HPV positive and one of two HPV negative cervical carcinomas showed telomerase upregulation. Conclusions: Telomerase is activated in invasive cervical carcinoma. Although larger studies are needed, there seems to be no clear association between telomerase upregulation and HPV status, although there is a suggestion of increased telomerase activity in squamous carcinomas and late stage disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036144881&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036144881&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 22

EP - 26

JO - Journal of Clinical Pathology - Clinical Molecular Pathology

JF - Journal of Clinical Pathology - Clinical Molecular Pathology

SN - 0021-9746

IS - 1

ER -