Technology and school leadership

Mojgan Afshari, Kamariah Abu Bakar, Wong Su Luan, Bahaman Abu Samah, Foo Say Fooi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As the demand for schools to become more effective and efficient learning communities increases, the need for principals to cultivate broad-based, skilful participation in the work of leadership is essential. It is important for educational leaders to recognise the significance of their role in technology implementation and utilisation. They should be proficient in the use of technology and then provide leadership in the use of technology for administrative, instructional, and learning functions. Relatively few studies have empirically examined the level of computer use by principals, their perceived computer competence and their leadership style. This paper will report on these issues from an initial analysis of baseline data gathered from 30 secondary school principals in Tehran, a large province in Iran. Findings indicate that school principals spent a few times a week working on their computers and they had moderate levels of information technology competency. This paper also suggests that transformational leadership can help school leaders increase successful use of technology in schools. Hence, policy makers must design professional development programmes, such as leadership studies, in order to teach the components of transformational leadership: idealised influence, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation and individual consideration to future administrators.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-248
Number of pages14
JournalTechnology, Pedagogy and Education
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

leadership
school
principal
working week
leader
Information technology
level of information
learning
Iran
secondary school
information technology
utilization
participation
demand
community

Keywords

  • Information communication technology
  • School principal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Communication
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Information Systems

Cite this

Afshari, M., Abu Bakar, K., Luan, W. S., Samah, B. A., & Fooi, F. S. (2009). Technology and school leadership. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 18(2), 235-248. https://doi.org/10.1080/14759390902992527

Technology and school leadership. / Afshari, Mojgan; Abu Bakar, Kamariah; Luan, Wong Su; Samah, Bahaman Abu; Fooi, Foo Say.

In: Technology, Pedagogy and Education, Vol. 18, No. 2, 07.2009, p. 235-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Afshari, M, Abu Bakar, K, Luan, WS, Samah, BA & Fooi, FS 2009, 'Technology and school leadership', Technology, Pedagogy and Education, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 235-248. https://doi.org/10.1080/14759390902992527
Afshari, Mojgan ; Abu Bakar, Kamariah ; Luan, Wong Su ; Samah, Bahaman Abu ; Fooi, Foo Say. / Technology and school leadership. In: Technology, Pedagogy and Education. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 235-248.
@article{c0c1d8bc3a654613869cfa5e536666ab,
title = "Technology and school leadership",
abstract = "As the demand for schools to become more effective and efficient learning communities increases, the need for principals to cultivate broad-based, skilful participation in the work of leadership is essential. It is important for educational leaders to recognise the significance of their role in technology implementation and utilisation. They should be proficient in the use of technology and then provide leadership in the use of technology for administrative, instructional, and learning functions. Relatively few studies have empirically examined the level of computer use by principals, their perceived computer competence and their leadership style. This paper will report on these issues from an initial analysis of baseline data gathered from 30 secondary school principals in Tehran, a large province in Iran. Findings indicate that school principals spent a few times a week working on their computers and they had moderate levels of information technology competency. This paper also suggests that transformational leadership can help school leaders increase successful use of technology in schools. Hence, policy makers must design professional development programmes, such as leadership studies, in order to teach the components of transformational leadership: idealised influence, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation and individual consideration to future administrators.",
keywords = "Information communication technology, School principal",
author = "Mojgan Afshari and {Abu Bakar}, Kamariah and Luan, {Wong Su} and Samah, {Bahaman Abu} and Fooi, {Foo Say}",
year = "2009",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1080/14759390902992527",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "235--248",
journal = "Technology, Pedagogy and Education",
issn = "1475-939X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Technology and school leadership

AU - Afshari, Mojgan

AU - Abu Bakar, Kamariah

AU - Luan, Wong Su

AU - Samah, Bahaman Abu

AU - Fooi, Foo Say

PY - 2009/7

Y1 - 2009/7

N2 - As the demand for schools to become more effective and efficient learning communities increases, the need for principals to cultivate broad-based, skilful participation in the work of leadership is essential. It is important for educational leaders to recognise the significance of their role in technology implementation and utilisation. They should be proficient in the use of technology and then provide leadership in the use of technology for administrative, instructional, and learning functions. Relatively few studies have empirically examined the level of computer use by principals, their perceived computer competence and their leadership style. This paper will report on these issues from an initial analysis of baseline data gathered from 30 secondary school principals in Tehran, a large province in Iran. Findings indicate that school principals spent a few times a week working on their computers and they had moderate levels of information technology competency. This paper also suggests that transformational leadership can help school leaders increase successful use of technology in schools. Hence, policy makers must design professional development programmes, such as leadership studies, in order to teach the components of transformational leadership: idealised influence, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation and individual consideration to future administrators.

AB - As the demand for schools to become more effective and efficient learning communities increases, the need for principals to cultivate broad-based, skilful participation in the work of leadership is essential. It is important for educational leaders to recognise the significance of their role in technology implementation and utilisation. They should be proficient in the use of technology and then provide leadership in the use of technology for administrative, instructional, and learning functions. Relatively few studies have empirically examined the level of computer use by principals, their perceived computer competence and their leadership style. This paper will report on these issues from an initial analysis of baseline data gathered from 30 secondary school principals in Tehran, a large province in Iran. Findings indicate that school principals spent a few times a week working on their computers and they had moderate levels of information technology competency. This paper also suggests that transformational leadership can help school leaders increase successful use of technology in schools. Hence, policy makers must design professional development programmes, such as leadership studies, in order to teach the components of transformational leadership: idealised influence, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation and individual consideration to future administrators.

KW - Information communication technology

KW - School principal

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=75249096228&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=75249096228&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/14759390902992527

DO - 10.1080/14759390902992527

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:75249096228

VL - 18

SP - 235

EP - 248

JO - Technology, Pedagogy and Education

JF - Technology, Pedagogy and Education

SN - 1475-939X

IS - 2

ER -