Teacher's perspective on infrastructure of special education's classroom in Malaysia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

To provide children with special needs with comfortable, safe, and controlled learning, it is important to create continuity in the environment so that they would have equal access to education like typical students. Therefore, the specific infrastructure, such as barrier-free facilities, wheelchair access, a comfortable classroom, and safety aspects, should be taken into account for purposes of teaching and learning. Studies conducted in the form combine qualitative and quantitative aspects and involve observation, interviews, and questionnaires, with teachers and school administrators as respondents. The findings showed that 37.7 percent of the respondents are not sure about the classroom space needed by each special education student. Approximately 30 percent of the respondents also are uncertain, given the financial allocation for special education integration program. In addition, the majority of respondents (53.6%) are satisfied with the location of the special education program at their school, located on the ground floor of each building. Approximately 55.8 percent of the respondents agreed that the special education classroom in their schools have adequate lighting, and 52 percent agreed that there is good air circulation. However, 41.9 percent of the respondents did not agree with the space available for learning process because it does not match the capacity of students and teachers at a time. Some respondents indicated that insufficient infrastructure, especially for basic amenities, such as chairs, tables, fans, teaching aids (BBM), LCD facilities, computers, and others. In conclusion, the integration of special education programs needs much improvement especially in the accessibility of special needs students so that their right to have an education does not remain neglected. Therefore, the development of infrastructure and special education classroom modifications should be done using a certified standard.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProcedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences
Pages291-294
Number of pages4
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event1st World Conference on Learning, Teaching and Administration, WCLTA-2010 - Cairo, Egypt
Duration: 29 Oct 201031 Oct 2010

Other

Other1st World Conference on Learning, Teaching and Administration, WCLTA-2010
CountryEgypt
CityCairo
Period29/10/1031/10/10

Fingerprint

Special Education
Malaysia
special education
infrastructure
classroom
teacher
Students
Learning
student
school
teaching aids
Teaching
fan
Education
work environment
Architectural Accessibility
Wheelchairs
learning
Surveys and Questionnaires
learning process

Keywords

  • Classroom
  • Infrastructure
  • Special education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Teacher's perspective on infrastructure of special education's classroom in Malaysia. / Mohd Yasin, Mohd Hanafi; Toran, Hasnah; Tahar, Mohd Mokhtar; Bari, Safani.

Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Vol. 9 2010. p. 291-294.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mohd Yasin, MH, Toran, H, Tahar, MM & Bari, S 2010, Teacher's perspective on infrastructure of special education's classroom in Malaysia. in Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences. vol. 9, pp. 291-294, 1st World Conference on Learning, Teaching and Administration, WCLTA-2010, Cairo, Egypt, 29/10/10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2010.12.152
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