Synthesis of low-cost catalyst NiO(111) for CO2 hydrogenation into short-chain carboxylic acids

S. Z. Hasan, K. N. Ahmad, W. N.R.W. Isahak, M. S. Masdar, J. M. Jahim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Reducing gaseous carbon dioxide to valuable chemicals and fuels by using gaseous hydrogen can decrease the concentration of greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. Carbon dioxide conversion into fuels such as methane, methanol, and formic acid is a good hydrogen-storage method. In this paper, a comparative study of CO2 conversion into formic and acetic acids on alumina-supported nickel oxide with and without the presence of carbon is reported. NiO (111) with high surface area was synthesized through a simple and one-pot fusion solid-state method at 550 °C and 700 °C. The synthesized catalysts were tested in carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction in a batch slurry reactor at 130 °C and under mild pressure. Interestingly, the optimum condition of the reaction also successfully produced C2 carboxylic acid in significant amounts. The highest levels of formic acid and acetic acid production were 8.13 and 7.63 mmol/L, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Formic acid
formic acid
Carboxylic acids
carboxylic acids
Hydrogenation
hydrogenation
carbon dioxide
Carbon dioxide
acetic acid
catalysts
Acetic acid
acids
Catalysts
synthesis
Costs
Nickel oxide
global warming
nickel oxides
greenhouses
Hydrogen storage

Keywords

  • CO utilization
  • C–C bond
  • Formic acid
  • Mitigation
  • NiO (111)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Fuel Technology
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology

Cite this

@article{953f4d341b1e49c8b89a2c2b9e7ee66e,
title = "Synthesis of low-cost catalyst NiO(111) for CO2 hydrogenation into short-chain carboxylic acids",
abstract = "Reducing gaseous carbon dioxide to valuable chemicals and fuels by using gaseous hydrogen can decrease the concentration of greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. Carbon dioxide conversion into fuels such as methane, methanol, and formic acid is a good hydrogen-storage method. In this paper, a comparative study of CO2 conversion into formic and acetic acids on alumina-supported nickel oxide with and without the presence of carbon is reported. NiO (111) with high surface area was synthesized through a simple and one-pot fusion solid-state method at 550 °C and 700 °C. The synthesized catalysts were tested in carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction in a batch slurry reactor at 130 °C and under mild pressure. Interestingly, the optimum condition of the reaction also successfully produced C2 carboxylic acid in significant amounts. The highest levels of formic acid and acetic acid production were 8.13 and 7.63 mmol/L, respectively.",
keywords = "CO utilization, C–C bond, Formic acid, Mitigation, NiO (111)",
author = "Hasan, {S. Z.} and Ahmad, {K. N.} and Isahak, {W. N.R.W.} and Masdar, {M. S.} and Jahim, {J. M.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijhydene.2019.09.102",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Hydrogen Energy",
issn = "0360-3199",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Synthesis of low-cost catalyst NiO(111) for CO2 hydrogenation into short-chain carboxylic acids

AU - Hasan, S. Z.

AU - Ahmad, K. N.

AU - Isahak, W. N.R.W.

AU - Masdar, M. S.

AU - Jahim, J. M.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Reducing gaseous carbon dioxide to valuable chemicals and fuels by using gaseous hydrogen can decrease the concentration of greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. Carbon dioxide conversion into fuels such as methane, methanol, and formic acid is a good hydrogen-storage method. In this paper, a comparative study of CO2 conversion into formic and acetic acids on alumina-supported nickel oxide with and without the presence of carbon is reported. NiO (111) with high surface area was synthesized through a simple and one-pot fusion solid-state method at 550 °C and 700 °C. The synthesized catalysts were tested in carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction in a batch slurry reactor at 130 °C and under mild pressure. Interestingly, the optimum condition of the reaction also successfully produced C2 carboxylic acid in significant amounts. The highest levels of formic acid and acetic acid production were 8.13 and 7.63 mmol/L, respectively.

AB - Reducing gaseous carbon dioxide to valuable chemicals and fuels by using gaseous hydrogen can decrease the concentration of greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. Carbon dioxide conversion into fuels such as methane, methanol, and formic acid is a good hydrogen-storage method. In this paper, a comparative study of CO2 conversion into formic and acetic acids on alumina-supported nickel oxide with and without the presence of carbon is reported. NiO (111) with high surface area was synthesized through a simple and one-pot fusion solid-state method at 550 °C and 700 °C. The synthesized catalysts were tested in carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction in a batch slurry reactor at 130 °C and under mild pressure. Interestingly, the optimum condition of the reaction also successfully produced C2 carboxylic acid in significant amounts. The highest levels of formic acid and acetic acid production were 8.13 and 7.63 mmol/L, respectively.

KW - CO utilization

KW - C–C bond

KW - Formic acid

KW - Mitigation

KW - NiO (111)

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85073068561&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85073068561&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijhydene.2019.09.102

DO - 10.1016/j.ijhydene.2019.09.102

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85073068561

JO - International Journal of Hydrogen Energy

JF - International Journal of Hydrogen Energy

SN - 0360-3199

ER -