Symbolism in traditional Malay boat crafting in the East Coast

Mohd Rohaizat Abdul Wahab, Zuliskandar Ramli, Nurul Norain Akhemal Ismail, Nuratikah Abu Bakar, Wan Nor Shamimi Wan Azhar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The culture in the East Coast are rich in visual arts and performing arts inherited over time immemorial. The art is also found to have similarities in three different states, despite their geographical gap. The similarities are shared in dialects, languages, presentations, builds, and past legacy artefacts. The Malay craftsmanship is also dominated by the Malay community in the East Coast and it is also produced in the form of art and fashion. Artefacts such as boats, houses, and furniture are still visible until now and they have high artistic value. This research is aimed at displaying symbols produced by the Malay community on the craft of the boat. This art can be seen in the carvings and paintings produced on traditional Malay boats in the East Coast. This art does not only serve as an ornament and for its aesthetics, but also has its own symbolism. The decorative art produced shows that the three main aspects necessary in Malay art are function, aesthetics, and ethics. The belief in the existence of supernatural powers – which preserve and safeguard their safety at sea and their ability to get income from marine products – underpins the craft of this decoration art.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)294-302
Number of pages9
JournalPlanning Malaysia
Volume16
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

symbolism
art
coast
esthetics
artifact
aesthetics
ethics
dialect
community
symbol
moral philosophy
income
safety

Keywords

  • Boat
  • Crafting
  • Environment
  • Symbolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Wahab, M. R. A., Ramli, Z., Ismail, N. N. A., Bakar, N. A., & Azhar, W. N. S. W. (2018). Symbolism in traditional Malay boat crafting in the East Coast. Planning Malaysia, 16(1), 294-302.

Symbolism in traditional Malay boat crafting in the East Coast. / Wahab, Mohd Rohaizat Abdul; Ramli, Zuliskandar; Ismail, Nurul Norain Akhemal; Bakar, Nuratikah Abu; Azhar, Wan Nor Shamimi Wan.

In: Planning Malaysia, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 294-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wahab, MRA, Ramli, Z, Ismail, NNA, Bakar, NA & Azhar, WNSW 2018, 'Symbolism in traditional Malay boat crafting in the East Coast', Planning Malaysia, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 294-302.
Wahab MRA, Ramli Z, Ismail NNA, Bakar NA, Azhar WNSW. Symbolism in traditional Malay boat crafting in the East Coast. Planning Malaysia. 2018 Jan 1;16(1):294-302.
Wahab, Mohd Rohaizat Abdul ; Ramli, Zuliskandar ; Ismail, Nurul Norain Akhemal ; Bakar, Nuratikah Abu ; Azhar, Wan Nor Shamimi Wan. / Symbolism in traditional Malay boat crafting in the East Coast. In: Planning Malaysia. 2018 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 294-302.
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