Sustainable development of Lagong Hill forest reserve, Malaysia

Ah Choy Er, Raja Datuk Zaharaton Raja Zainal Abidin, Joy Jacqueline Pereira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Lagong Hill Forest Reserve, gazetted as a forest reserve, is rich in forest biodiversity and is also a water catchment area. The aim of this paper is to assess Lagong Hill Forest Reserve from the perspective of sustainable development. The concept of resource transition by relying on nature's "income" without depleting its "capital" is applied. Inclusive in the assessment of sustainable development is cultural pluralism as there are two indigenous settlements in this forest reserve. The major findings are related to the economic activities of quarrying, timber production and ecotourism, and the livelihood of the indigenous villagers, in terms of their impact on sustainable development. Quarrying is an extractive industry based on finite resources. This is basically depleting the "capital" of this forest reserve. In addition, rehabilitation and beautification works needs to be taken at the end of the concession period to prevent rock fall or landside and also for aesthetics respectively. The adoption of Reduced Impact Logging on a compartmental basis can lead to sustainable timber by tapping on natures "income" without depleting its "capital". However, a more detailed scientific research needs to be undertaken to assess the impact of quarrying and timber production on soil erosion, water catchment functionality and forest biodiversity. The park management of the ecotourism resort accords the highest priority towards nature conservation. Nature conservation is tapping on the "interest" without depleting its "capital". However, a scientific determination of carrying capacity is required for its expansion plan. The indigenous people not only "take" from the forest in terms of fish and forest produce but also "give" in return by being the custodians or guardians of the forest. The in-situ development for the indigenous villagers helps to ensure the continuity of their traditional lifestyle. The quarrying concessionaires and timber licensee employ the indigenous people as manual workers. More could be done in terms of corporate social responsibility by empowering the indigenous workers via career management and skills training. The park management lacks an outreach initiative to incorporate the indigenous villagers in a symbiotic manner to develop community-based ecotourism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)364-370
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences
Volume5
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Fingerprint

quarrying
sustainable development
ecotourism
park management
forestry production
nature conservation
timber
income
biodiversity
resource
carrying capacity
esthetics
lifestyle
economic activity
soil erosion
forest reserve
catchment
water
fish
rock

Keywords

  • Forest revenue
  • Indigenous people
  • Nature conservation
  • Sustainable development
  • Timber production and quarrying

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Sustainable development of Lagong Hill forest reserve, Malaysia. / Er, Ah Choy; Abidin, Raja Datuk Zaharaton Raja Zainal; Pereira, Joy Jacqueline.

In: Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences, Vol. 5, No. 7, 07.2011, p. 364-370.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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