Sulfur and nitrogen containing plasma polymers reduces bacterial attachment and growth

Kim S. Siow, Arifah Syahirah Abdul Rahman, Pei Yuen Ng, Burhanuddin Y. Majlis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Role of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) groups in promoting cell adhesion or commonly known as biocompatibility, is well established, but their role in reducing bacterial attachment and growth is less explored or not well-understood. Natural sulfur-based compounds, i.e. sulfide, sulfoxide and sulfinic groups, have shown to inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Hence, we mimicked these surfaces by plasma polymerizing thiophene (ppT) and air-plasma treating this ppT to achieve coatings with S of similar oxidation states as natural compounds (ppT-air). In addition, the effects of these N and S groups from ppT-air were also compared with the biocompatible amine-amide from n-heptylamine plasma polymer. Crystal violet assay and live and dead fluorescence staining of E. coli and S. aureus showed that all the N and S coated surfaces generated, including ppHA, ppT and ppT-air, produced similarly potent, growth reduction of both bacteria by approximately 65% at 72 h compared to untreated glass control. The ability of osteogenic differentiation in Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs) were also used to test the cell biocompatibility of these surfaces. Alkaline phosphatase assay and scanning electron microscopy imaging of these WJ-MSCs growths indicated that ppHA, and ppT-air were cell-friendly surfaces, with ppHA showing the highest osteogenic activity. In summary, the N and S containing surfaces could reduce bacteria growth while promoting mammalian cell growth, thus serve as potential candidate surfaces to be explored further for biomaterial applications.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110225
JournalMaterials Science and Engineering C
Volume107
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2020

Fingerprint

plastic coatings
Plastic coatings
Plasma polymerization
Thiophenes
mammals
biofilms
Flowcharting
phosphatases
Mammals
nitrogen plasma
stem cells
Cell adhesion
Phosphatases
Cell proliferation
Biofilms
biocompatibility
Thiophene
thiophenes
Stem cells
Biocompatibility

Keywords

  • Anti-bacterial coating
  • Biofilm
  • N-heptylamine
  • Plasma polymerization
  • Sulfur
  • Thiophene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Sulfur and nitrogen containing plasma polymers reduces bacterial attachment and growth. / Siow, Kim S.; Abdul Rahman, Arifah Syahirah; Ng, Pei Yuen; Majlis, Burhanuddin Y.

In: Materials Science and Engineering C, Vol. 107, 110225, 02.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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