Suicidal ideation amongst epilepsy patients in a tertiary centre

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Abstract

Background and Objective: Epilepsy and depression are interlinked and lead to an increased risk of suicidal ideation and suicide. Although depression is a significant risk factor for suicidal ideation in epilepsy patients, epilepsy itself is independently associated with suicidal ideation. There are various other factors related to epilepsy that further increase this risk. Methods: We conducted a study of suicidal-ideation amongst epilepsy patients in our centre. Demographic data and clinical history were obtained while suicidal ideation was determined using the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Beck's Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to identify presence of depression. Results: We recruited 80 patients with epilepsy and an equal number of controls. Epilepsy patients were more likely to be depressed with a mean BDI-II score of 9.09 ±6.48 compared to controls who has a mean score of 5.56 ±4.56. The proportion of epilepsy patients with suicidal ideation was 33.75% vs. 5.00% in the control group (p<0.001). Epilepsy patients were 9.68 times more likely to have suicidal ideation compared to controls: OR 9.68 (95% CI 3.19, 29.28). Amongst epilepsy patients, those with suicidal ideation were more likely to be on 3 or more anti-epileptic drugs (10.00% vs. 6.25%, p=0.016), with a higher seizure frequency (11.25% vs. 2.50%, p=0.004) and higher incidence of previous head surgery (10.00% vs. 5.00%, p=0.022). Conclusion: Suicidal ideation was significantly prevalent amongst epilepsy patients especially in patients with frequent seizures, use of ≥ 3 anti-epileptic drugs or prior head surgery. Our findings suggest that assessment of suicidal ideation is pertinent in high-risk epilepsy patients and should be routinely carried out in the clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-136
Number of pages8
JournalNeurology Asia
Volume19
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Suicidal Ideation
Epilepsy
Depression
Suicide
Seizures
Head
Equipment and Supplies
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

@article{923a434bb76143bfb03bc67d9ae79f95,
title = "Suicidal ideation amongst epilepsy patients in a tertiary centre",
abstract = "Background and Objective: Epilepsy and depression are interlinked and lead to an increased risk of suicidal ideation and suicide. Although depression is a significant risk factor for suicidal ideation in epilepsy patients, epilepsy itself is independently associated with suicidal ideation. There are various other factors related to epilepsy that further increase this risk. Methods: We conducted a study of suicidal-ideation amongst epilepsy patients in our centre. Demographic data and clinical history were obtained while suicidal ideation was determined using the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Beck's Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to identify presence of depression. Results: We recruited 80 patients with epilepsy and an equal number of controls. Epilepsy patients were more likely to be depressed with a mean BDI-II score of 9.09 ±6.48 compared to controls who has a mean score of 5.56 ±4.56. The proportion of epilepsy patients with suicidal ideation was 33.75{\%} vs. 5.00{\%} in the control group (p<0.001). Epilepsy patients were 9.68 times more likely to have suicidal ideation compared to controls: OR 9.68 (95{\%} CI 3.19, 29.28). Amongst epilepsy patients, those with suicidal ideation were more likely to be on 3 or more anti-epileptic drugs (10.00{\%} vs. 6.25{\%}, p=0.016), with a higher seizure frequency (11.25{\%} vs. 2.50{\%}, p=0.004) and higher incidence of previous head surgery (10.00{\%} vs. 5.00{\%}, p=0.022). Conclusion: Suicidal ideation was significantly prevalent amongst epilepsy patients especially in patients with frequent seizures, use of ≥ 3 anti-epileptic drugs or prior head surgery. Our findings suggest that assessment of suicidal ideation is pertinent in high-risk epilepsy patients and should be routinely carried out in the clinical setting.",
author = "Rani, {Rafiz Abdul} and Rosdinom Razali and Rozita Hod and Khairiyah Mohamad and {Md. Rani}, {Shahrul Azmin} and {Wan Yahya}, {Wan Nur Nafisah} and Ramesh Sahathevan and Rabani Remli and Law, {Zhe Kang} and {Mohamed Ibrahim}, Norlinah and Tan, {Hui Jan}",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "129--136",
journal = "Neurology Asia",
issn = "1823-6138",
publisher = "ASEAN Neurological Association",
number = "2",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Suicidal ideation amongst epilepsy patients in a tertiary centre

AU - Rani, Rafiz Abdul

AU - Razali, Rosdinom

AU - Hod, Rozita

AU - Mohamad, Khairiyah

AU - Md. Rani, Shahrul Azmin

AU - Wan Yahya, Wan Nur Nafisah

AU - Sahathevan, Ramesh

AU - Remli, Rabani

AU - Law, Zhe Kang

AU - Mohamed Ibrahim, Norlinah

AU - Tan, Hui Jan

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background and Objective: Epilepsy and depression are interlinked and lead to an increased risk of suicidal ideation and suicide. Although depression is a significant risk factor for suicidal ideation in epilepsy patients, epilepsy itself is independently associated with suicidal ideation. There are various other factors related to epilepsy that further increase this risk. Methods: We conducted a study of suicidal-ideation amongst epilepsy patients in our centre. Demographic data and clinical history were obtained while suicidal ideation was determined using the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Beck's Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to identify presence of depression. Results: We recruited 80 patients with epilepsy and an equal number of controls. Epilepsy patients were more likely to be depressed with a mean BDI-II score of 9.09 ±6.48 compared to controls who has a mean score of 5.56 ±4.56. The proportion of epilepsy patients with suicidal ideation was 33.75% vs. 5.00% in the control group (p<0.001). Epilepsy patients were 9.68 times more likely to have suicidal ideation compared to controls: OR 9.68 (95% CI 3.19, 29.28). Amongst epilepsy patients, those with suicidal ideation were more likely to be on 3 or more anti-epileptic drugs (10.00% vs. 6.25%, p=0.016), with a higher seizure frequency (11.25% vs. 2.50%, p=0.004) and higher incidence of previous head surgery (10.00% vs. 5.00%, p=0.022). Conclusion: Suicidal ideation was significantly prevalent amongst epilepsy patients especially in patients with frequent seizures, use of ≥ 3 anti-epileptic drugs or prior head surgery. Our findings suggest that assessment of suicidal ideation is pertinent in high-risk epilepsy patients and should be routinely carried out in the clinical setting.

AB - Background and Objective: Epilepsy and depression are interlinked and lead to an increased risk of suicidal ideation and suicide. Although depression is a significant risk factor for suicidal ideation in epilepsy patients, epilepsy itself is independently associated with suicidal ideation. There are various other factors related to epilepsy that further increase this risk. Methods: We conducted a study of suicidal-ideation amongst epilepsy patients in our centre. Demographic data and clinical history were obtained while suicidal ideation was determined using the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Beck's Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to identify presence of depression. Results: We recruited 80 patients with epilepsy and an equal number of controls. Epilepsy patients were more likely to be depressed with a mean BDI-II score of 9.09 ±6.48 compared to controls who has a mean score of 5.56 ±4.56. The proportion of epilepsy patients with suicidal ideation was 33.75% vs. 5.00% in the control group (p<0.001). Epilepsy patients were 9.68 times more likely to have suicidal ideation compared to controls: OR 9.68 (95% CI 3.19, 29.28). Amongst epilepsy patients, those with suicidal ideation were more likely to be on 3 or more anti-epileptic drugs (10.00% vs. 6.25%, p=0.016), with a higher seizure frequency (11.25% vs. 2.50%, p=0.004) and higher incidence of previous head surgery (10.00% vs. 5.00%, p=0.022). Conclusion: Suicidal ideation was significantly prevalent amongst epilepsy patients especially in patients with frequent seizures, use of ≥ 3 anti-epileptic drugs or prior head surgery. Our findings suggest that assessment of suicidal ideation is pertinent in high-risk epilepsy patients and should be routinely carried out in the clinical setting.

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M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 129

EP - 136

JO - Neurology Asia

JF - Neurology Asia

SN - 1823-6138

IS - 2

ER -