Sugars and sweeteners: science, innovations, and consumer guidance for Asia

Adam Drewnowski, Luc Tappy, Ciaran G. Forde, Keri McCrickerd, E. Siong Tee, Pauline Chan, Latifah Amin, Trinidad P. Trinidad, Maria Sofia Amarra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Rising obesity in Southeast Asia, one consequence of economic growth, has been linked to a rising consumption of energy from added sugars. This symposium, organized by ILSI Southeast Asia, explored regional issues related to dietary sugars and health and identified ways in which these issues could be addressed by regional regulatory agencies, food producers, and the consumer. METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN: Papers on the following topics were presented: 1) current scientific evidence on the effects of sugars and non-caloric sweeteners on body weight, health, and eating behaviors; 2) innovations by food producers to reduce sugar consumption in the region; 3) regional dietary surveillance of sugar consumption and suggestions for consumer guidance. A panel discussion explored effective approaches to promote healthy eating in the region. RESULTS: Excessive consumption of energy in the form of added sugars can have adverse consequences on diet quality, lipid profiles, and health. There is a need for better surveillance of total and added sugars intakes in selected Southeast Asian countries. Among feasible alternatives to corn sweeteners (high fructose corn syrup) and cane sugar are indigenous sweeteners with low glycemic index (e.g., coconut sap sugar). Their health benefits should be examined and regional sugar consumption tracked in detail. Product reformulation to develop palatable lower calorie alternatives that are accepted by consumers continues to be a challenge for industry and regulatory agencies. CONCLUSIONS: Public-private collaborations to develop healthy products and effective communication strategies can facilitate consumer acceptance and adoption of healthier foods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)645-663
Number of pages19
JournalAsia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Sweetening Agents
Dietary Sucrose
Southeastern Asia
Food
Health
Glycemic Index
Cocos
Canes
Economic Development
Feeding Behavior
Insurance Benefits
Zea mays
Industry
Obesity
Communication
Body Weight
Diet
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Drewnowski, A., Tappy, L., Forde, C. G., McCrickerd, K., Tee, E. S., Chan, P., ... Amarra, M. S. (2019). Sugars and sweeteners: science, innovations, and consumer guidance for Asia. Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, 28(3), 645-663. https://doi.org/10.6133/apjcn.201909_28(3).0025

Sugars and sweeteners : science, innovations, and consumer guidance for Asia. / Drewnowski, Adam; Tappy, Luc; Forde, Ciaran G.; McCrickerd, Keri; Tee, E. Siong; Chan, Pauline; Amin, Latifah; Trinidad, Trinidad P.; Amarra, Maria Sofia.

In: Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.01.2019, p. 645-663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Drewnowski, A, Tappy, L, Forde, CG, McCrickerd, K, Tee, ES, Chan, P, Amin, L, Trinidad, TP & Amarra, MS 2019, 'Sugars and sweeteners: science, innovations, and consumer guidance for Asia', Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 645-663. https://doi.org/10.6133/apjcn.201909_28(3).0025
Drewnowski, Adam ; Tappy, Luc ; Forde, Ciaran G. ; McCrickerd, Keri ; Tee, E. Siong ; Chan, Pauline ; Amin, Latifah ; Trinidad, Trinidad P. ; Amarra, Maria Sofia. / Sugars and sweeteners : science, innovations, and consumer guidance for Asia. In: Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 645-663.
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