Studies on hibernating populations of the mosquito culex pipiens l. In southern and northern england

S. Sulaiman, M. W. Service

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    19 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The population fluctuation of diapausing adult females Culex pipiens overwintering in man-made shelters in southern and northern England was studied from 1967-71 and 1978-82, respectively. Females with well developed fat reserves started to enter hibernation sites in July and August, maximum numbers were reached in October-November, after which there was a large reduction in population so usually less than 10% of the population emerged from hibernation sites in April-May to begin the new spring generation. Spiders killed some hibernating adults. Although pathogenic fungi are known to cause large mortalities in some shelters, in the present ones such fungi were absent or very rare. However, in situations where predators and pathogens cause little mortality there is still a large loss of hibernating adults towards the end of hibernation. This mortality probably results from stresses caused by depletion of fat reserves, so in effect the mosquitoes die of ‘old age’.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)849-857
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Natural History
    Volume17
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1983

    Fingerprint

    hibernation
    Culex pipiens
    mosquito
    fat reserve
    England
    Culicidae
    mortality
    shelter
    fungus
    fungi
    overwintering
    lipids
    spider
    Araneae
    pathogen
    predator
    predators
    pathogens

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

    Cite this

    Studies on hibernating populations of the mosquito culex pipiens l. In southern and northern england. / Sulaiman, S.; Service, M. W.

    In: Journal of Natural History, Vol. 17, No. 6, 1983, p. 849-857.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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