Structured debriefings in aviation simulations: A qualitative study on basic life support training for cabin crews in Malaysia

Muhamad Nur Fariduddin, Lei Hum Wee, Halim Lilia, Jaafar Mohd Johar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: To develop quality cabin crews, trainings involve simulation-based education (SBE) with structured debriefings – a significant component which plays a critical role in optimising learning outcomes. Previous studies have empirically tested the efficacy of the DIAMOND-structured debriefing model and found significant improvement and retention of the cabin crews’ knowledge and skills. This study was aimed to explore the elements of the DIAMOND-structured debriefing model that have been known to promote the acquisition and retention of knowledge and skills in basic life support (BLS). Methods: A qualitative study was conducted with a random sample of 16 individual cabin crew members who participated in an in-depth interview with 13 open-ended questions for 45 – 60 minutes. The interviews were transcribed and independently analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Results: The codes which have emerged during data analysis were clustered into three themes: (1) Cognitive, with three sub-themes: engagement, learning environment, and ability to reflect; (2) Methodology, with three sub-themes: concept of debriefing, techniques of questioning, and additional elements; as well as (3) Psychosocial, with five sub-themes: attitude, self-awareness, relationships, self-confidence, and work culture. Several suggestions have emerged, such as the implementation of the model. Conclusion: The DIAMOND-structured debriefing model was a method to reduce cognitive load, which in turn allowed individuals to organise their knowledge, reflect individually and collectively, as well as structure their ideas. It has showed that the elements has a positive impact on the cabin crews’ acquisition and retention of knowledge and skills which will improve the performance and patient safety

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-45
Number of pages9
JournalMalaysian Journal of Medicine and Health Sciences
Volume15
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Training Support
Aviation
Malaysia
Learning
Interviews
Aptitude
Patient Safety
Education
Simulation Training

Keywords

  • Aviation Education
  • Cabin Crew
  • Cognitive Load
  • Simulation Learning
  • Structured Debriefing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Structured debriefings in aviation simulations : A qualitative study on basic life support training for cabin crews in Malaysia. / Fariduddin, Muhamad Nur; Wee, Lei Hum; Lilia, Halim; Johar, Jaafar Mohd.

In: Malaysian Journal of Medicine and Health Sciences, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.01.2019, p. 37-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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