Structure of the Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus exosome RNase PH ring

Chyan Leong Ng, David G. Waterman, Alfred A. Antson, Miguel Ortiz-Lombardía

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The core of the exosome, a versatile multisubunit RNA-processing enzyme found in archaea and eukaryotes, includes a ring of six RNase PH subunits. This basic architecture is homologous to those of the bacterial and archaeal RNase PHs and the bacterial polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). While all six RNase PH monomers are catalytically active in the homohexameric RNase PH, only half of them are functional in the bacterial PNPase and in the archaeal exosome core and none are functional in the yeast and human exosome cores. Here, the crystal structure of the RNase PH ring from the exosome of the anaerobic methanogenic archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus is described at 2.65 Å resolution. Free phosphate anions were found for the first time in the active sites of the RNase PH subunits of an exosome structure and provide structural snapshots of a critical intermediate in the phosphorolytic degradation of RNA by the exosome. Furthermore, the present structure highlights the plasticity of the surfaces delineating the polar regions of the RNase PH ring of the exosome, a feature that can facilitate both interaction with the many cofactors involved in exosome function and the processive activity of this enzyme.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)522-528
Number of pages7
JournalActa Crystallographica Section D: Biological Crystallography
Volume66
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Apr 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Methanobacteriaceae
Exosomes
Polyribonucleotide Nucleotidyltransferase
Archaea
Exosome Multienzyme Ribonuclease Complex
Cold Climate
Enzymes
ribonuclease PH
Eukaryota
Anions
Catalytic Domain
Yeasts
Phosphates
RNA

Keywords

  • Exosome
  • Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus
  • RNase PH ring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Structural Biology

Cite this

Structure of the Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus exosome RNase PH ring. / Ng, Chyan Leong; Waterman, David G.; Antson, Alfred A.; Ortiz-Lombardía, Miguel.

In: Acta Crystallographica Section D: Biological Crystallography, Vol. 66, No. 5, 21.04.2010, p. 522-528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ng, Chyan Leong ; Waterman, David G. ; Antson, Alfred A. ; Ortiz-Lombardía, Miguel. / Structure of the Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus exosome RNase PH ring. In: Acta Crystallographica Section D: Biological Crystallography. 2010 ; Vol. 66, No. 5. pp. 522-528.
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