Stocking density and tank size in the design of breed improvement programs for body size of tilapia

Graham A E Gall, Yosni Bakar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Various aspects of cultural conditions were investigated in an effort to design an efficient selective breeding scheme for tilapia. High density culture has the potential of reducing confounding environmental effects associated with fish behavior. Body size of fry reared through 56 days was not affected by any of the stocking densities used (10-200 fry/l) with uniform water inflow. However, when water inflow was proportional to fish density, high density culture of fingerlings (18 fish/l) did appear to promote growth and result in improved normality of the distribution of body size relative to fish stocked at lower (2 fish/l) or higher (200 fish/l) densities. Although this could be interpreted as a consequence of diminished social interactions, a definitive conclusion could not be made in the absence of direct observational data on individual fish. Mixed-model methodology was used to estimate genetic parameters for body size. Estimated heritability for body weight was about 0.25 for all ages from 56 to 126 days. Phenotypic and genetic correlations among body weights at various ages were positive and near unity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-205
Number of pages9
JournalAquaculture
Volume173
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Mar 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

stocking density
tilapia (common name)
stocking rate
body size
breeds
fish
fish fry
inflow
fish behavior
body weight
selective breeding
phenotypic correlation
fingerlings
selection methods
genetic correlation
heritability
programme
environmental effect
water
methodology

Keywords

  • Breed improvement
  • Density
  • Growth
  • Tilapia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Stocking density and tank size in the design of breed improvement programs for body size of tilapia. / Gall, Graham A E; Bakar, Yosni.

In: Aquaculture, Vol. 173, No. 1-4, 30.03.1999, p. 197-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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