Standards and emerging linguistic realities in the Malaysian workplace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Malaysia, like many other countries belonging to the Outer Circle, is in a position where she has to grapple with notions of English language standards. With the medium of education having been Bahasa Malaysia since 1970, there has emerged in the workforce educated speakers who speak sub-varieties of formal Malaysian English. These make up the executives who contribute to various organisations, whose businesses depend on both intranational and international connections. One of the essential skills required of these executives is that of delivering business presentations both internally to colleagues and superiors and externally to customers of the organisation. This research investigates: how Malaysian linguists perceive and categorise the sub-varieties of Malaysian English, as spoken by select speakers, along the lectal continuum; whether gatekeepers (those who possess decision-making powers in the respective organisations) regard the same select speakers acceptable for delivering business presentations to different audiences, both internal and external to the organisation. The dynamics of the perspectives of both the linguists and the gatekeepers will throw essential light on what is acceptable and what is not acceptable in relation to standards and the emerging linguistic realities in the workplace.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-231
Number of pages17
JournalWorld Englishes
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1999

Fingerprint

gatekeeper
Malaysia
workplace
linguistics
English language
customer
decision making
education
Work Place
Gatekeeper
Malaysian English

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Standards and emerging linguistic realities in the Malaysian workplace. / Delip Singh, Saran Kaur.

In: World Englishes, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.01.1999, p. 215-231.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{049312fa490942c2a63f357a55c8ef73,
title = "Standards and emerging linguistic realities in the Malaysian workplace",
abstract = "Malaysia, like many other countries belonging to the Outer Circle, is in a position where she has to grapple with notions of English language standards. With the medium of education having been Bahasa Malaysia since 1970, there has emerged in the workforce educated speakers who speak sub-varieties of formal Malaysian English. These make up the executives who contribute to various organisations, whose businesses depend on both intranational and international connections. One of the essential skills required of these executives is that of delivering business presentations both internally to colleagues and superiors and externally to customers of the organisation. This research investigates: how Malaysian linguists perceive and categorise the sub-varieties of Malaysian English, as spoken by select speakers, along the lectal continuum; whether gatekeepers (those who possess decision-making powers in the respective organisations) regard the same select speakers acceptable for delivering business presentations to different audiences, both internal and external to the organisation. The dynamics of the perspectives of both the linguists and the gatekeepers will throw essential light on what is acceptable and what is not acceptable in relation to standards and the emerging linguistic realities in the workplace.",
author = "{Delip Singh}, {Saran Kaur}",
year = "1999",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/1467-971X.00135",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "215--231",
journal = "World Englishes",
issn = "0883-2919",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Standards and emerging linguistic realities in the Malaysian workplace

AU - Delip Singh, Saran Kaur

PY - 1999/1/1

Y1 - 1999/1/1

N2 - Malaysia, like many other countries belonging to the Outer Circle, is in a position where she has to grapple with notions of English language standards. With the medium of education having been Bahasa Malaysia since 1970, there has emerged in the workforce educated speakers who speak sub-varieties of formal Malaysian English. These make up the executives who contribute to various organisations, whose businesses depend on both intranational and international connections. One of the essential skills required of these executives is that of delivering business presentations both internally to colleagues and superiors and externally to customers of the organisation. This research investigates: how Malaysian linguists perceive and categorise the sub-varieties of Malaysian English, as spoken by select speakers, along the lectal continuum; whether gatekeepers (those who possess decision-making powers in the respective organisations) regard the same select speakers acceptable for delivering business presentations to different audiences, both internal and external to the organisation. The dynamics of the perspectives of both the linguists and the gatekeepers will throw essential light on what is acceptable and what is not acceptable in relation to standards and the emerging linguistic realities in the workplace.

AB - Malaysia, like many other countries belonging to the Outer Circle, is in a position where she has to grapple with notions of English language standards. With the medium of education having been Bahasa Malaysia since 1970, there has emerged in the workforce educated speakers who speak sub-varieties of formal Malaysian English. These make up the executives who contribute to various organisations, whose businesses depend on both intranational and international connections. One of the essential skills required of these executives is that of delivering business presentations both internally to colleagues and superiors and externally to customers of the organisation. This research investigates: how Malaysian linguists perceive and categorise the sub-varieties of Malaysian English, as spoken by select speakers, along the lectal continuum; whether gatekeepers (those who possess decision-making powers in the respective organisations) regard the same select speakers acceptable for delivering business presentations to different audiences, both internal and external to the organisation. The dynamics of the perspectives of both the linguists and the gatekeepers will throw essential light on what is acceptable and what is not acceptable in relation to standards and the emerging linguistic realities in the workplace.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84989397233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84989397233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/1467-971X.00135

DO - 10.1111/1467-971X.00135

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 215

EP - 231

JO - World Englishes

JF - World Englishes

SN - 0883-2919

IS - 2

ER -