Staged resection in the management of HIV-related anogenital giant condyloma acuminatum. A case report

Guo Hou Loo, Li Yi Lim, Zulkifli Md Zainuddin, Xeng Inn Fam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Giant condyloma acuminata (GCA), also known as Bushke-Lowenstein tumour, is a rare disease which affects 0.1% of the population. Although histopathologically benign, it tends to be locally destructive. The common sites of involvement include the penis and the anorectum. Due to the rarity of the disease, there is a lack of controlled studies on the optimal management of this entity. Thus, we report a case of anogenital GCA in a 40-year-old HIV-positive man. Case presentation: A 40-year-old man presented with progressive anogenital warts associated with foul-smelling discharge and fever. He has been diagnosed with HIV and was on HAART on presentation. A warty excrescence had infiltrated the entire external genitalia, gluteals and sacral region. Serial excision was performed along with a defunctioning colostomy. The patient recovered well, and the final histopathological showed features of GCA. Discussion: With HIV, the HPV infection goes unchecked may develop into GCA. Malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma may occur in more than half of the cases. A complex interaction between HIV and HPV may lead to a higher risk of recurrence even after resection. The diagnosis is usually clinical. Imaging modalities may be used in identifying the extent and depth of invasion. Conclusion: The optimal management of anogenital giant condyloma acuminata remains to be determined. Staged surgical excision should be conducted to achieve an optimum outcome. Radical reconstructive surgery should be reserved for patients with recurrence, malignant transformation or sphincter involvement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-76
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Medicine and Surgery
Volume48
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

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Buschke-Lowenstein Tumor
HIV
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
Sacrococcygeal Region
Recurrence
Warts
Genitalia
Colostomy
Penis
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
Rare Diseases
HIV Infections
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Fever
Population
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Anogenital warts
  • Bushke-lowenstein tumour
  • Defunctioning colostomy in genital warts
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Human papilloma virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

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title = "Staged resection in the management of HIV-related anogenital giant condyloma acuminatum. A case report",
abstract = "Introduction: Giant condyloma acuminata (GCA), also known as Bushke-Lowenstein tumour, is a rare disease which affects 0.1{\%} of the population. Although histopathologically benign, it tends to be locally destructive. The common sites of involvement include the penis and the anorectum. Due to the rarity of the disease, there is a lack of controlled studies on the optimal management of this entity. Thus, we report a case of anogenital GCA in a 40-year-old HIV-positive man. Case presentation: A 40-year-old man presented with progressive anogenital warts associated with foul-smelling discharge and fever. He has been diagnosed with HIV and was on HAART on presentation. A warty excrescence had infiltrated the entire external genitalia, gluteals and sacral region. Serial excision was performed along with a defunctioning colostomy. The patient recovered well, and the final histopathological showed features of GCA. Discussion: With HIV, the HPV infection goes unchecked may develop into GCA. Malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma may occur in more than half of the cases. A complex interaction between HIV and HPV may lead to a higher risk of recurrence even after resection. The diagnosis is usually clinical. Imaging modalities may be used in identifying the extent and depth of invasion. Conclusion: The optimal management of anogenital giant condyloma acuminata remains to be determined. Staged surgical excision should be conducted to achieve an optimum outcome. Radical reconstructive surgery should be reserved for patients with recurrence, malignant transformation or sphincter involvement.",
keywords = "Anogenital warts, Bushke-lowenstein tumour, Defunctioning colostomy in genital warts, Human immunodeficiency virus, Human papilloma virus",
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T1 - Staged resection in the management of HIV-related anogenital giant condyloma acuminatum. A case report

AU - Loo, Guo Hou

AU - Lim, Li Yi

AU - Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

AU - Fam, Xeng Inn

PY - 2019/12

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N2 - Introduction: Giant condyloma acuminata (GCA), also known as Bushke-Lowenstein tumour, is a rare disease which affects 0.1% of the population. Although histopathologically benign, it tends to be locally destructive. The common sites of involvement include the penis and the anorectum. Due to the rarity of the disease, there is a lack of controlled studies on the optimal management of this entity. Thus, we report a case of anogenital GCA in a 40-year-old HIV-positive man. Case presentation: A 40-year-old man presented with progressive anogenital warts associated with foul-smelling discharge and fever. He has been diagnosed with HIV and was on HAART on presentation. A warty excrescence had infiltrated the entire external genitalia, gluteals and sacral region. Serial excision was performed along with a defunctioning colostomy. The patient recovered well, and the final histopathological showed features of GCA. Discussion: With HIV, the HPV infection goes unchecked may develop into GCA. Malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma may occur in more than half of the cases. A complex interaction between HIV and HPV may lead to a higher risk of recurrence even after resection. The diagnosis is usually clinical. Imaging modalities may be used in identifying the extent and depth of invasion. Conclusion: The optimal management of anogenital giant condyloma acuminata remains to be determined. Staged surgical excision should be conducted to achieve an optimum outcome. Radical reconstructive surgery should be reserved for patients with recurrence, malignant transformation or sphincter involvement.

AB - Introduction: Giant condyloma acuminata (GCA), also known as Bushke-Lowenstein tumour, is a rare disease which affects 0.1% of the population. Although histopathologically benign, it tends to be locally destructive. The common sites of involvement include the penis and the anorectum. Due to the rarity of the disease, there is a lack of controlled studies on the optimal management of this entity. Thus, we report a case of anogenital GCA in a 40-year-old HIV-positive man. Case presentation: A 40-year-old man presented with progressive anogenital warts associated with foul-smelling discharge and fever. He has been diagnosed with HIV and was on HAART on presentation. A warty excrescence had infiltrated the entire external genitalia, gluteals and sacral region. Serial excision was performed along with a defunctioning colostomy. The patient recovered well, and the final histopathological showed features of GCA. Discussion: With HIV, the HPV infection goes unchecked may develop into GCA. Malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma may occur in more than half of the cases. A complex interaction between HIV and HPV may lead to a higher risk of recurrence even after resection. The diagnosis is usually clinical. Imaging modalities may be used in identifying the extent and depth of invasion. Conclusion: The optimal management of anogenital giant condyloma acuminata remains to be determined. Staged surgical excision should be conducted to achieve an optimum outcome. Radical reconstructive surgery should be reserved for patients with recurrence, malignant transformation or sphincter involvement.

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