Spinal injuries in a level-one trauma centre

A demographic study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence of spinal injuries in Malaysia is on the rise following similar trend of rapid development and increasing number of building constructions sites, and motor vehicles. This epidemiological study was aimed at compiling local data with a view to identifying target areas for preventive measures as well as improvement strategies in the management of these potentially devastating injuries. Seventy eight patients admitted with spine trauma in 1998 in a level-one trauma centre were retrospectively reviewed. All records were traced from the admission and discharge books of the orthopaedic wards, accident and emergency wards, operative registration book, spinal rehabilitation ward and orthopaedic registration data of the Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital Kuala Lumpur. Details on pre-treatment neurological and radiological level of injury and post-treatment outcomes were recorded according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Most patients (61.5%) were in the productive ages of less than 34 years with a 4:1 male to female ratio. Majority were due to motor vehicle accidents (57.7%) and fall from a height (28.3%). The thoraco-lumbar junction was the most common site of injury followed by the lower cervical region with 62.5% of which associated with neurological deficit. Neurological deficits: 11 ASIA-A, 1 ASIA-B, 6 ASIA-C, and 3 ASIA-D were detected in 21 (27%) patients with fall from height (50%) particularly landing on the feet (50%) and recreational sports (100%) were the risk factors. Less than 10% of patients were treated surgically and this explains an average 39.4 days of hospitalization (5 times longer in patients treated non-operatively). On discharge, four patients with incomplete neurology recovered to ASIA-E status and the remaining improved to ASIA-C and -D in one and five patients respectively. Only one patient with complete neurology improved to ASIA-B status following surgical treatment. The demographic profiles of our patients were comparable to other series in the literature but still inadequate to provide enough epidemiological data. A multicenter study to provide a larger pool of patients is needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-35
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Journal of Malaysia
Volume61
Issue numberSUPPL. A
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2006

Fingerprint

Spinal Injuries
Trauma Centers
Demography
Orthopedics
Wounds and Injuries
Motor Vehicles
Neurology
Accidents
Malaysia
Hospital Departments
Multicenter Studies
Sports
Hospital Emergency Service
Foot
Epidemiologic Studies
Hospitalization
Spine
Rehabilitation

Keywords

  • Cord injury
  • Epidemiology
  • Spinal trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Spinal injuries in a level-one trauma centre : A demographic study. / Roohi, S. A.; Selvi Naicker, Amaramalar; Shukur, Ya Mohamad Hassan; Mohammad, A. R.

In: Medical Journal of Malaysia, Vol. 61, No. SUPPL. A, 02.2006, p. 30-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e4d6b5572d5347ab95c6c2dc1b36affd,
title = "Spinal injuries in a level-one trauma centre: A demographic study",
abstract = "The incidence of spinal injuries in Malaysia is on the rise following similar trend of rapid development and increasing number of building constructions sites, and motor vehicles. This epidemiological study was aimed at compiling local data with a view to identifying target areas for preventive measures as well as improvement strategies in the management of these potentially devastating injuries. Seventy eight patients admitted with spine trauma in 1998 in a level-one trauma centre were retrospectively reviewed. All records were traced from the admission and discharge books of the orthopaedic wards, accident and emergency wards, operative registration book, spinal rehabilitation ward and orthopaedic registration data of the Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital Kuala Lumpur. Details on pre-treatment neurological and radiological level of injury and post-treatment outcomes were recorded according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Most patients (61.5{\%}) were in the productive ages of less than 34 years with a 4:1 male to female ratio. Majority were due to motor vehicle accidents (57.7{\%}) and fall from a height (28.3{\%}). The thoraco-lumbar junction was the most common site of injury followed by the lower cervical region with 62.5{\%} of which associated with neurological deficit. Neurological deficits: 11 ASIA-A, 1 ASIA-B, 6 ASIA-C, and 3 ASIA-D were detected in 21 (27{\%}) patients with fall from height (50{\%}) particularly landing on the feet (50{\%}) and recreational sports (100{\%}) were the risk factors. Less than 10{\%} of patients were treated surgically and this explains an average 39.4 days of hospitalization (5 times longer in patients treated non-operatively). On discharge, four patients with incomplete neurology recovered to ASIA-E status and the remaining improved to ASIA-C and -D in one and five patients respectively. Only one patient with complete neurology improved to ASIA-B status following surgical treatment. The demographic profiles of our patients were comparable to other series in the literature but still inadequate to provide enough epidemiological data. A multicenter study to provide a larger pool of patients is needed.",
keywords = "Cord injury, Epidemiology, Spinal trauma",
author = "Roohi, {S. A.} and {Selvi Naicker}, Amaramalar and Shukur, {Ya Mohamad Hassan} and Mohammad, {A. R.}",
year = "2006",
month = "2",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "30--35",
journal = "Medical Journal of Malaysia",
issn = "0300-5283",
publisher = "Malaysian Medical Association",
number = "SUPPL. A",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spinal injuries in a level-one trauma centre

T2 - A demographic study

AU - Roohi, S. A.

AU - Selvi Naicker, Amaramalar

AU - Shukur, Ya Mohamad Hassan

AU - Mohammad, A. R.

PY - 2006/2

Y1 - 2006/2

N2 - The incidence of spinal injuries in Malaysia is on the rise following similar trend of rapid development and increasing number of building constructions sites, and motor vehicles. This epidemiological study was aimed at compiling local data with a view to identifying target areas for preventive measures as well as improvement strategies in the management of these potentially devastating injuries. Seventy eight patients admitted with spine trauma in 1998 in a level-one trauma centre were retrospectively reviewed. All records were traced from the admission and discharge books of the orthopaedic wards, accident and emergency wards, operative registration book, spinal rehabilitation ward and orthopaedic registration data of the Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital Kuala Lumpur. Details on pre-treatment neurological and radiological level of injury and post-treatment outcomes were recorded according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Most patients (61.5%) were in the productive ages of less than 34 years with a 4:1 male to female ratio. Majority were due to motor vehicle accidents (57.7%) and fall from a height (28.3%). The thoraco-lumbar junction was the most common site of injury followed by the lower cervical region with 62.5% of which associated with neurological deficit. Neurological deficits: 11 ASIA-A, 1 ASIA-B, 6 ASIA-C, and 3 ASIA-D were detected in 21 (27%) patients with fall from height (50%) particularly landing on the feet (50%) and recreational sports (100%) were the risk factors. Less than 10% of patients were treated surgically and this explains an average 39.4 days of hospitalization (5 times longer in patients treated non-operatively). On discharge, four patients with incomplete neurology recovered to ASIA-E status and the remaining improved to ASIA-C and -D in one and five patients respectively. Only one patient with complete neurology improved to ASIA-B status following surgical treatment. The demographic profiles of our patients were comparable to other series in the literature but still inadequate to provide enough epidemiological data. A multicenter study to provide a larger pool of patients is needed.

AB - The incidence of spinal injuries in Malaysia is on the rise following similar trend of rapid development and increasing number of building constructions sites, and motor vehicles. This epidemiological study was aimed at compiling local data with a view to identifying target areas for preventive measures as well as improvement strategies in the management of these potentially devastating injuries. Seventy eight patients admitted with spine trauma in 1998 in a level-one trauma centre were retrospectively reviewed. All records were traced from the admission and discharge books of the orthopaedic wards, accident and emergency wards, operative registration book, spinal rehabilitation ward and orthopaedic registration data of the Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital Kuala Lumpur. Details on pre-treatment neurological and radiological level of injury and post-treatment outcomes were recorded according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Most patients (61.5%) were in the productive ages of less than 34 years with a 4:1 male to female ratio. Majority were due to motor vehicle accidents (57.7%) and fall from a height (28.3%). The thoraco-lumbar junction was the most common site of injury followed by the lower cervical region with 62.5% of which associated with neurological deficit. Neurological deficits: 11 ASIA-A, 1 ASIA-B, 6 ASIA-C, and 3 ASIA-D were detected in 21 (27%) patients with fall from height (50%) particularly landing on the feet (50%) and recreational sports (100%) were the risk factors. Less than 10% of patients were treated surgically and this explains an average 39.4 days of hospitalization (5 times longer in patients treated non-operatively). On discharge, four patients with incomplete neurology recovered to ASIA-E status and the remaining improved to ASIA-C and -D in one and five patients respectively. Only one patient with complete neurology improved to ASIA-B status following surgical treatment. The demographic profiles of our patients were comparable to other series in the literature but still inadequate to provide enough epidemiological data. A multicenter study to provide a larger pool of patients is needed.

KW - Cord injury

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Spinal trauma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33746862968&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33746862968&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 61

SP - 30

EP - 35

JO - Medical Journal of Malaysia

JF - Medical Journal of Malaysia

SN - 0300-5283

IS - SUPPL. A

ER -