Spinal infection--an overview and the results of treatment.

M. Razak, Z. H. Kamari, S. Roohi

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A retrospective review of thirty-eight patients (16 males and 22 females) with spinal infection between 1993 and 1998 revealed that the mean age was 39.9 years and the peak incidence was in the 5th decade of life. Infections in thirty-two patients (84.2%) were tuberculous in origin, 13.2% were pyogenic and 2.6% were fungal. Back pain was a symptom in 94.7% while 55.8% had neurological deficits, of which two-thirds were tuberculous in origin. Twenty-two patients (57.9%) had an impaired immune status secondary to pulmonary either tuberculosis, diabetes mellitus, intravenous drug abuse, prolonged steroid treatment, malnutrition, or advanced age. History of contact with tuberculous patients was elicited in 31.3%, extraskeletal tuberculosis was found in 28.1%, while Mantoux test was only positive in 53.1% of tuberculous patients. Majority of the cases (57.9%) involved lumbar vertebra. The histopathological examination was only positive in 22.2% from material taken via CT guided biopsy but 93.3% were found to be conclusive from open biopsy. 4 out of 5 patients who had a pyogenic infection were treated conservatively and produced a good result. There was no difference in outcome for tuberculosis patients treated with either the 3 drug or 4 drug regimen. Anterior decompression and bone grafting in tuberculous patients was superior in terms of a faster fusion rate, early pain relief and prevention of kvphotic deformity. The initial neurological deficit did not reflect the future prognosis of patients with spinal infection.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)18-28
    Number of pages11
    JournalMedical Journal of Malaysia
    Volume55 Suppl C
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2000

    Fingerprint

    Infection
    Therapeutics
    Tuberculosis
    Intravenous Substance Abuse
    Biopsy
    Lumbar Vertebrae
    Bone Transplantation
    Back Pain
    Decompression
    Pulmonary Tuberculosis
    Malnutrition
    Pharmaceutical Preparations
    Diabetes Mellitus
    Steroids
    Pain
    Incidence

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Razak, M., Kamari, Z. H., & Roohi, S. (2000). Spinal infection--an overview and the results of treatment. Medical Journal of Malaysia, 55 Suppl C, 18-28.

    Spinal infection--an overview and the results of treatment. / Razak, M.; Kamari, Z. H.; Roohi, S.

    In: Medical Journal of Malaysia, Vol. 55 Suppl C, 09.2000, p. 18-28.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Razak, M, Kamari, ZH & Roohi, S 2000, 'Spinal infection--an overview and the results of treatment.', Medical Journal of Malaysia, vol. 55 Suppl C, pp. 18-28.
    Razak M, Kamari ZH, Roohi S. Spinal infection--an overview and the results of treatment. Medical Journal of Malaysia. 2000 Sep;55 Suppl C:18-28.
    Razak, M. ; Kamari, Z. H. ; Roohi, S. / Spinal infection--an overview and the results of treatment. In: Medical Journal of Malaysia. 2000 ; Vol. 55 Suppl C. pp. 18-28.
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