Specificity in English for Academic Purposes (EAP): A corpus analysis of lexical bundles in academic writing

Ang Leng Hong, Kim Hua Tan

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The issue of specificity in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) settings has always challenged linguists and instructors in the field to take a stance on how language should be perceived, that is whether language forms and features are transferable across different academic disciplines or are specific to particular disciplines. This study intends to take this debate a step further by employing a corpus-driven method in identifying a type of phraseological sequence, namely lexical bundles in a corpus of journal articles in the field of International Business Management (IBM). The lexical bundles were compared with those compiled by Simpson-Vlach and Ellis (2010) in their study of Academic Formulas List (AFL) to determine the specificity of the lexical bundles identified in this study. Following frequency-based approach, the corpus tool, Collocate 1.0 was used to extract three- to five-word sequences. These word sequences were manually filtered to exclude irrelevant and meaningless combinations. The qualified lexical bundles were compiled and compared with lexical bundles in AFL (Simpson-Vlach and Ellis 2010) using log-likelihood test. The findings show that three-word lexical bundles are the most common types of lexical bundles in IBM corpus. The comparison reveals that lexical bundles in IBM corpus are relatively specific as compared with lexical bundles in AFL. A discipline-specific approach to the teaching and learning of lexical bundles in EAP settings is therefore advocated to enhance EAP syllabuses and instruction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-94
Number of pages13
Journal3L: Language, Linguistics, Literature
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

business management
language
instructor
instruction
Teaching
learning
Specificity
English for Academic Purposes
Lexical Bundles
Corpus Analysis
Academic Writing

Keywords

  • Discipline-specific
  • EAP
  • Frequency-based
  • Lexical bundles
  • Phraseological sequences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

Specificity in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) : A corpus analysis of lexical bundles in academic writing. / Hong, Ang Leng; Tan, Kim Hua.

In: 3L: Language, Linguistics, Literature, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.01.2018, p. 82-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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