Spatial distribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the biofilm and suspended growth biomass of the full- and partial-bed biological aerated filters

Fatihah Suja`, T. Donnelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The extent of comparable nitrogen removal in the full- and partial-bed biological aerated reactors needs further microbiological evidence, specifically the existence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The nitrogen removal process in such systems is typically initiated by chemoliautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria converting ammonia to nitrite and traces of oxidized nitrogen gases. The formation of a dense biofilm as a result of higher turbulence would account for the higher number of AOB cells enumerated in the biofilm samples from the partial-bed reactor (4.3 105 ± 1.9 105 No. of AOB cells/mL sample) as compared with those from the full-bed reactor (1.5 105 ± 8.0 104 No. of AOB cells/mL sample).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1859-1866
Number of pages8
JournalCanadian Journal of Civil Engineering
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2009

Fingerprint

Biological filter beds
Biofilms
Spatial distribution
biofilm
Ammonia
Bacteria
Biomass
ammonia
spatial distribution
filter
bacterium
biomass
Nitrogen removal
nitrogen
nitrite
Turbulence
turbulence
Nitrogen
Gases
gas

Keywords

  • Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria
  • Biofilm
  • Fluorescent in-situ hybridization
  • Suspended growth biomass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Cite this

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AB - The extent of comparable nitrogen removal in the full- and partial-bed biological aerated reactors needs further microbiological evidence, specifically the existence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The nitrogen removal process in such systems is typically initiated by chemoliautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria converting ammonia to nitrite and traces of oxidized nitrogen gases. The formation of a dense biofilm as a result of higher turbulence would account for the higher number of AOB cells enumerated in the biofilm samples from the partial-bed reactor (4.3 105 ± 1.9 105 No. of AOB cells/mL sample) as compared with those from the full-bed reactor (1.5 105 ± 8.0 104 No. of AOB cells/mL sample).

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