Space and the city: Gender identities in seventeenth-century Norwich

Fiona Williamson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Influenced by interdisciplinary studies and the 'spatial turn' in social history, this article explores the relationship between space and the construction of gender identity amongst the poor to middling sorts of seventeenth-century Norwich. To this end I have considered gendered interaction in different 'types' of space: domestic, private space, 'borderline' space - such as the alehouse or threshold - and, finally, the public space of streets and markets. Each section explores the relevance of recent spatial historiography in the Norwich context, and evaluates whether men and women inhabited different 'worlds' in the city, not only in terms of their physical movement or access to certain places but also, more importantly, in terms of how their presence was perceived, and thus their identity shaped by others. The empirical basis is primarily defamation depositions of the Norwich Diocese Court, largely used by the middling sorts, contextualized where appropriate with secular court records.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-185
Number of pages17
JournalCultural and Social History
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

seventeenth century
diocese
social history
gender
public space
historiography
market
interaction
Gender Identity
Norwich

Keywords

  • Defamation
  • Gender
  • Private
  • Public
  • Space
  • Urban

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • History

Cite this

Space and the city : Gender identities in seventeenth-century Norwich. / Williamson, Fiona.

In: Cultural and Social History, Vol. 9, No. 2, 06.2012, p. 169-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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