Solid-state materials and methods for hydrogen storage: A critical review

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

153 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hydrogen is important as a new source of energy for automotive applications. It is clear that the key challenge in developing this technology is hydrogen storage. Current methods for hydrogen storage have yet to meet all the demands for onboard applications. High-pressure gas storage or liquefaction cannot fulfill the storage criteria required for on-board storage. Solid-state materials have shown potential advantages for hydrogen storage in comparison to other storage methods. In this article, the most popular solid-state storage materials and methods including carbon based materials, metal hydrides, metal organic frameworks, hollow glass microspheres, capillary arrays, clathrate hydrates, metal nitrides and imides, doped polymer and zeolites, are critically reviewed. The survey shows that most of the materials available with high storage capacity have disadvantages associated with slow kinetics and those materials with fast kinetics have issues with low storage capacity. Most of the chemisorption-based materials are very expensive and in some cases, the hydrogen absorption/desorption phenomena isirreversible. Furthermore, a very high temperature is required to release the adsorbed hydrogen. On the other hand, the main drawback in the case of physisorption-based materials and methods is their lower capacity for hydrogen storage, especially under mild operating conditions. To accomplish the requisite goals, extensive research studies are still required to optimize the critical parameters of such systems, including the safety (to be improved), security (to be available for all), cost (to be lowered), storage capacity (to be increased), and the sorption-desorption kinetics (to be improved).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-226
Number of pages14
JournalChemical Engineering and Technology
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Fingerprint

Hydrogen storage
Hydrogen
Metals
Kinetics
Desorption
Liquefaction of gases
Imides
Zeolites
Physisorption
Gas fuel storage
Chemisorption
Hydrates
Microspheres
Hydrides
Nitrides
Sorption
Polymers
Carbon
Glass
Costs

Keywords

  • Capillary array
  • Carbon nanotubes (CNT)
  • Clathrates hydride
  • Doped polymers
  • Hollow glass microspheres (HGM)
  • Hydrogen storage
  • Metal hydrides
  • Metal imides
  • Metal nitrides
  • Metal organic frameworks (MOF)
  • Solid-state materials
  • Zeolites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Solid-state materials and methods for hydrogen storage : A critical review. / Lim, Kean Long; Kazemian, Hossein; Yaakob, Zahira; Wan Daud, Wan Ramli.

In: Chemical Engineering and Technology, Vol. 33, No. 2, 02.2010, p. 213-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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