Soil-transmitted helminths: The neglected parasites

Hesham M. Al-Mekhlafi, Yvonne A L Lim, Norhayati Moktar, Romano Ngui

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are still considered to be the most prevalent infections of humankind. STH, traditionally endemic in rural areas, are increasingly becoming a public health concern in urban slums of cities in tropical and subtropical developing countries in Southeast Asia, sub-Saharan Africa and Central and South America. These helminths, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm (Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus), Trichuris trichiura and Strongyloides stercoralis, can live in silence as chronic infections with prominent morbidity amongst children and mothers of childbearing age. The main impact of STH infections is their associations with malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency (VAD), iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA), intellectual retardation and cognitive and educational deficits. The devastating consequences of these helminths during childhood may continue into adulthood with effects on the economic productivity which trap the communities at risk of infections in a cycle of poverty, underdevelopment and disease. Hence, the WHO regarded the control of STH amongst the top five health priorities within the global massive effort to eradicate poverty. Moreover, controlling STH infections has significant positive impacts on the nutritional status and educational performance of the vulnerable children in endemic communities.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationParasites and their vectors: A special focus on Southeast Asia
PublisherSpringer-Verlag Wien
Pages205-232
Number of pages28
Volume9783709115534
ISBN (Print)9783709115534, 3709115523, 9783709115527
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Helminths
Parasites
Soil
Infection
Poverty
Necator americanus
Ancylostoma
Strongyloides stercoralis
Ascaris lumbricoides
Trichuris
Poverty Areas
Ancylostomatoidea
Vitamin A Deficiency
Central America
Health Priorities
Southeastern Asia
Iron-Deficiency Anemias
South America
Africa South of the Sahara
Nutritional Status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Al-Mekhlafi, H. M., Lim, Y. A. L., Moktar, N., & Ngui, R. (2013). Soil-transmitted helminths: The neglected parasites. In Parasites and their vectors: A special focus on Southeast Asia (Vol. 9783709115534, pp. 205-232). Springer-Verlag Wien. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-1553-4_11

Soil-transmitted helminths : The neglected parasites. / Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Lim, Yvonne A L; Moktar, Norhayati; Ngui, Romano.

Parasites and their vectors: A special focus on Southeast Asia. Vol. 9783709115534 Springer-Verlag Wien, 2013. p. 205-232.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Al-Mekhlafi, HM, Lim, YAL, Moktar, N & Ngui, R 2013, Soil-transmitted helminths: The neglected parasites. in Parasites and their vectors: A special focus on Southeast Asia. vol. 9783709115534, Springer-Verlag Wien, pp. 205-232. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-1553-4_11
Al-Mekhlafi HM, Lim YAL, Moktar N, Ngui R. Soil-transmitted helminths: The neglected parasites. In Parasites and their vectors: A special focus on Southeast Asia. Vol. 9783709115534. Springer-Verlag Wien. 2013. p. 205-232 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-1553-4_11
Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M. ; Lim, Yvonne A L ; Moktar, Norhayati ; Ngui, Romano. / Soil-transmitted helminths : The neglected parasites. Parasites and their vectors: A special focus on Southeast Asia. Vol. 9783709115534 Springer-Verlag Wien, 2013. pp. 205-232
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