Soil-Transmitted helminth infections and associated risk factors in three orang asli tribes in peninsular Malaysia

Tengku Shahrul Anuar, Fatmah Md Salleh, Norhayati Moktar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Currently, information on prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections among different tribes of Orang Asli (aboriginal) is scarce in Malaysia. The present study is a cross-sectional study aimed at determining the factors associated with the prevalence of STH infections among the Proto-Malay, Negrito and Senoi tribes. Faecal samples were collected from 500 participants and socioeconomic data was collected via pre-tested questionnaire. All samples were processed using formalin-ether sedimentation and Wheatley's trichrome staining. Trichuris trichiura (57%) was the most common STH seen among the participants, followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (23.8%) and hookworm (7.4%). Trichuriasis and ascariasis showed an age-dependency relationship; significantly higher rates were observed among Senois who aged <15 years. Likewise, Negritos also showed an age-dependency association with ascariasis affecting mainly the under 15 years old individuals. Multivariate logistic regression model indicated the following predictors of trichuriasis among these communities; being aged <15 years, consuming raw vegetables, belonging to a large household members (≥8) and earning low household income (<RM500). Meanwhile, ascariasis was significantly related to participants being aged <15 years and earning low household income. Two risk factors were found to be associated with hookworm infection; consuming raw vegetables and eating contaminated fresh fruits.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4101
JournalScientific Reports
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Feb 2014

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Ascariasis
Helminths
Malaysia
Trichuriasis
Soil
Vegetables
Infection
Logistic Models
Hookworm Infections
Ascaris lumbricoides
Trichuris
Ancylostomatoidea
Ether
Formaldehyde
Fruit
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating
Staining and Labeling
Dependency (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Soil-Transmitted helminth infections and associated risk factors in three orang asli tribes in peninsular Malaysia. / Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Salleh, Fatmah Md; Moktar, Norhayati.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 4, 4101, 14.02.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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