Sodium content in sauces-a major contributor of sodium intake in Malaysia

A cross-sectional survey

Suzana Shahar, Yee Xing You, Nurzetty Sofia Zainuddin, Viola Michael, Rashidah Ambak, Hasnah Haron, Feng J. He, Graham A. Macgregor

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Objective To investigate the sodium content in sauces sold in Malaysian supermarkets. Methods A cross-sectional market survey was conducted in 2017 of 233 sauces sold in Malaysian supermarkets. Information on the sodium content was collected from the product packaging and nutrient information panels of the sauces sold in the seven top supermarkets in the capital of Malaysia. Results Of the 233 sauces surveyed, 116 did not include sodium content information on the nutrient information panel (49.8%). Soy sauce (particularly sweet soy sauce) and ketchup (particularly chilli sauce) were found to be the highest number of products surveyed in the analysis (N=54 and N=48, respectively). The highest sodium content information was displayed by fish/prawn sauce (budu/cencalok) (5192±3228 mg/100 g) which was followed by the light/thin soy sauce (5116±2084 mg/100 g), and followed by salty soy sauce (4780±988 mg/100 g). The sodium content information of the imported sauces was higher compared with local products produced in Malaysia. However, for sweet soy sauce, the sodium content information of the local products was higher compared with the imported products. Of the 116 sauces which displayed information regarding their sodium content, only 18.2% of the salty soy sauce and 25% of the light/thin soy sauce were found to be below the 2017 Malaysian sodium guidelines. Furthermore, only 21.7% of chilli ketchup and no tomato ketchup were below the 2017 UK salt guidelines. Conclusions Almost half of the sauces surveyed did not include sodium content information on the nutrient information panel. It is recommended that sodium content information is provided on all sauces sold in Malaysia. Also, manufacturers should be urged to reduce the sodium content level of their sauces to a minimum of 5%.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere025068
JournalBMJ Open
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Soy Foods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Sodium
Food
Guidelines
Light
Product Packaging
Lycopersicon esculentum
Fishes
Salts

Keywords

  • nutrition labelling
  • product survey
  • salt intake
  • sauces
  • sodium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sodium content in sauces-a major contributor of sodium intake in Malaysia : A cross-sectional survey. / Shahar, Suzana; You, Yee Xing; Zainuddin, Nurzetty Sofia; Michael, Viola; Ambak, Rashidah; Haron, Hasnah; He, Feng J.; Macgregor, Graham A.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 9, No. 5, e025068, 01.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Shahar, Suzana ; You, Yee Xing ; Zainuddin, Nurzetty Sofia ; Michael, Viola ; Ambak, Rashidah ; Haron, Hasnah ; He, Feng J. ; Macgregor, Graham A. / Sodium content in sauces-a major contributor of sodium intake in Malaysia : A cross-sectional survey. In: BMJ Open. 2019 ; Vol. 9, No. 5.
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abstract = "Objective To investigate the sodium content in sauces sold in Malaysian supermarkets. Methods A cross-sectional market survey was conducted in 2017 of 233 sauces sold in Malaysian supermarkets. Information on the sodium content was collected from the product packaging and nutrient information panels of the sauces sold in the seven top supermarkets in the capital of Malaysia. Results Of the 233 sauces surveyed, 116 did not include sodium content information on the nutrient information panel (49.8{\%}). Soy sauce (particularly sweet soy sauce) and ketchup (particularly chilli sauce) were found to be the highest number of products surveyed in the analysis (N=54 and N=48, respectively). The highest sodium content information was displayed by fish/prawn sauce (budu/cencalok) (5192±3228 mg/100 g) which was followed by the light/thin soy sauce (5116±2084 mg/100 g), and followed by salty soy sauce (4780±988 mg/100 g). The sodium content information of the imported sauces was higher compared with local products produced in Malaysia. However, for sweet soy sauce, the sodium content information of the local products was higher compared with the imported products. Of the 116 sauces which displayed information regarding their sodium content, only 18.2{\%} of the salty soy sauce and 25{\%} of the light/thin soy sauce were found to be below the 2017 Malaysian sodium guidelines. Furthermore, only 21.7{\%} of chilli ketchup and no tomato ketchup were below the 2017 UK salt guidelines. Conclusions Almost half of the sauces surveyed did not include sodium content information on the nutrient information panel. It is recommended that sodium content information is provided on all sauces sold in Malaysia. Also, manufacturers should be urged to reduce the sodium content level of their sauces to a minimum of 5{\%}.",
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AU - Zainuddin, Nurzetty Sofia

AU - Michael, Viola

AU - Ambak, Rashidah

AU - Haron, Hasnah

AU - He, Feng J.

AU - Macgregor, Graham A.

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N2 - Objective To investigate the sodium content in sauces sold in Malaysian supermarkets. Methods A cross-sectional market survey was conducted in 2017 of 233 sauces sold in Malaysian supermarkets. Information on the sodium content was collected from the product packaging and nutrient information panels of the sauces sold in the seven top supermarkets in the capital of Malaysia. Results Of the 233 sauces surveyed, 116 did not include sodium content information on the nutrient information panel (49.8%). Soy sauce (particularly sweet soy sauce) and ketchup (particularly chilli sauce) were found to be the highest number of products surveyed in the analysis (N=54 and N=48, respectively). The highest sodium content information was displayed by fish/prawn sauce (budu/cencalok) (5192±3228 mg/100 g) which was followed by the light/thin soy sauce (5116±2084 mg/100 g), and followed by salty soy sauce (4780±988 mg/100 g). The sodium content information of the imported sauces was higher compared with local products produced in Malaysia. However, for sweet soy sauce, the sodium content information of the local products was higher compared with the imported products. Of the 116 sauces which displayed information regarding their sodium content, only 18.2% of the salty soy sauce and 25% of the light/thin soy sauce were found to be below the 2017 Malaysian sodium guidelines. Furthermore, only 21.7% of chilli ketchup and no tomato ketchup were below the 2017 UK salt guidelines. Conclusions Almost half of the sauces surveyed did not include sodium content information on the nutrient information panel. It is recommended that sodium content information is provided on all sauces sold in Malaysia. Also, manufacturers should be urged to reduce the sodium content level of their sauces to a minimum of 5%.

AB - Objective To investigate the sodium content in sauces sold in Malaysian supermarkets. Methods A cross-sectional market survey was conducted in 2017 of 233 sauces sold in Malaysian supermarkets. Information on the sodium content was collected from the product packaging and nutrient information panels of the sauces sold in the seven top supermarkets in the capital of Malaysia. Results Of the 233 sauces surveyed, 116 did not include sodium content information on the nutrient information panel (49.8%). Soy sauce (particularly sweet soy sauce) and ketchup (particularly chilli sauce) were found to be the highest number of products surveyed in the analysis (N=54 and N=48, respectively). The highest sodium content information was displayed by fish/prawn sauce (budu/cencalok) (5192±3228 mg/100 g) which was followed by the light/thin soy sauce (5116±2084 mg/100 g), and followed by salty soy sauce (4780±988 mg/100 g). The sodium content information of the imported sauces was higher compared with local products produced in Malaysia. However, for sweet soy sauce, the sodium content information of the local products was higher compared with the imported products. Of the 116 sauces which displayed information regarding their sodium content, only 18.2% of the salty soy sauce and 25% of the light/thin soy sauce were found to be below the 2017 Malaysian sodium guidelines. Furthermore, only 21.7% of chilli ketchup and no tomato ketchup were below the 2017 UK salt guidelines. Conclusions Almost half of the sauces surveyed did not include sodium content information on the nutrient information panel. It is recommended that sodium content information is provided on all sauces sold in Malaysia. Also, manufacturers should be urged to reduce the sodium content level of their sauces to a minimum of 5%.

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