Sleep quality and psychosocial correlates among elderly attendees of an urban primary care centre in Malaysia

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Abstract

Sleep quality can vary in relation to one’s general well-being and in the elderly, it is often affected by the presence of medical or psychological conditions. This study aims to determine the frequency of different components of sleep quality in the elderly, and their relationships with psychosocial and medical attributes. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 123 attendees aged 60 years and above at Pusat Perubatan Primer Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Sleep quality and psychological distress were assessed using the validated Malay versions of Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and Hamilton anxiety depression scale (HADS) respectively. Information on medical comorbidities and medications were obtained from the participants, their doctors and medical notes. Almost half of the patients experienced poor sleep quality (47.2%) which was significantly associated with older mean age (69.5 ±4.55). There was no statistical significance between sleep quality and other sociodemographic characteristics (gender, ethnicity and living arrangement). Most patients described their sleep quality as subjectively generally “fairly good” (69.1%) despite PSQI scores indicating poor sleep quality. A majority of the patients (59.3%) were on follow-up for 3 or more medical illnesses, with heart disease as the only medical comorbidity significantly associated with poor sleep quality. Most of them also complained of only “mild difficulty” with their sleep. Among the 7 sleep components of PSQI, “sleep disturbance” was the most frequent experience. Most experienced mild sleep disturbance (87.8%) and usage of hypnotic agents was low (6.5%). Only 23.6% of patients had significant psychological distress (HADS scores ≥ 8), with positive correlation with sleep quality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-273
Number of pages9
JournalNeurology Asia
Volume21
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016

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Malaysia
Primary Health Care
Sleep
Psychology
Comorbidity
Anxiety
Depression
Hypnotics and Sedatives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Sleep quality and psychosocial correlates among elderly attendees of an urban primary care centre in Malaysia",
abstract = "Sleep quality can vary in relation to one’s general well-being and in the elderly, it is often affected by the presence of medical or psychological conditions. This study aims to determine the frequency of different components of sleep quality in the elderly, and their relationships with psychosocial and medical attributes. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 123 attendees aged 60 years and above at Pusat Perubatan Primer Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Sleep quality and psychological distress were assessed using the validated Malay versions of Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and Hamilton anxiety depression scale (HADS) respectively. Information on medical comorbidities and medications were obtained from the participants, their doctors and medical notes. Almost half of the patients experienced poor sleep quality (47.2{\%}) which was significantly associated with older mean age (69.5 ±4.55). There was no statistical significance between sleep quality and other sociodemographic characteristics (gender, ethnicity and living arrangement). Most patients described their sleep quality as subjectively generally “fairly good” (69.1{\%}) despite PSQI scores indicating poor sleep quality. A majority of the patients (59.3{\%}) were on follow-up for 3 or more medical illnesses, with heart disease as the only medical comorbidity significantly associated with poor sleep quality. Most of them also complained of only “mild difficulty” with their sleep. Among the 7 sleep components of PSQI, “sleep disturbance” was the most frequent experience. Most experienced mild sleep disturbance (87.8{\%}) and usage of hypnotic agents was low (6.5{\%}). Only 23.6{\%} of patients had significant psychological distress (HADS scores ≥ 8), with positive correlation with sleep quality.",
author = "Rosdinom Razali and Julianita Ariffin and {Abdul Aziz}, {Aznida Firzah} and {Wan Puteh}, {Sharifa Ezat} and Suzaily Wahab and {Mohd Daud}, {Tuti Iryani}",
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