Sleep habits, food intake, and physical activity levels in normal and overweight and obese Malaysian children

Somayyeh Firouzi, Bee Koon Poh, Mohd Noor Ismail, Aidin Sadeghilar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to determine the association between sleep habits (including bedtime, wake up time, sleep duration, and sleep disorder score) and physical characteristics, physical activity level, and food pattern in overweight and obese versus normal weight children. Design: Case control study. Subjects: 164 Malaysian boys and girls aged 6-12 years. Methods: Anthropometric measurements included weight, height, waist circumference, and body fat percentage. Subjects divided into normal weight (n = 82) and overweight/obese (n = 82) group based on World Health Organization 2007 BMI-for-age criteria and were matched one by one based on ethnicity, gender, and age plus minus one year. Questionnaires related to sleep habits, physical activity, and food frequency were proxy-reported by parents. Sleep disorder score was measured by Children Sleep Habit Questionnaire. Results: Sleep disorder score and carbohydrate intake (%) to total energy intake were significantly higher in overweight/obese group (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively). After adjusting for age and gender, sleep disorder score was correlated with BMI (r = 0.275, p < 0.001), weight (r = 0.253, p < 0.001), and WC (r = 0.293, p < 0.001). Based on adjusted odd ratio, children with shortest sleep duration were found to have 4.5 times higher odds of being overweight/obese (odd ratio: 4.536, 95% CI: 1.912-8.898) compared to children with normal sleep duration. The odds of being overweight/obese in children with sleep disorder score higher than 48 were 2.17 times more than children with sleep disorder score less than 48. Conclusion: Children who sleep lees than normal amount, had poor sleep quality, and consumed more carbohydrates were at higher risk of overweight/obesity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalObesity Research and Clinical Practice
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

Habits
Sleep
Eating
Exercise
Weights and Measures
Odds Ratio
Carbohydrates
Food
Waist Circumference
Proxy
Energy Intake
Sleep Wake Disorders
Adipose Tissue
Case-Control Studies
Obesity
Parents

Keywords

  • Childhood obesity
  • Food intake
  • Physical activity level
  • Sleep disorders
  • Sleep habits

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Sleep habits, food intake, and physical activity levels in normal and overweight and obese Malaysian children. / Firouzi, Somayyeh; Poh, Bee Koon; Ismail, Mohd Noor; Sadeghilar, Aidin.

In: Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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