Sleep habits and disturbances in Malaysian children with epilepsy

Lai Choo Ong, Yang Wai Wai, Sau Wei Wong, Feizel Alsiddiq, Yi Soon Khu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To compare sleep habits and disturbances between Malaysian children with epilepsy and their siblings (age range 4-18 years) and to determine the factors associated with greater sleep disturbance. Methods: The Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC) questionnaire was completed by the primary caregiver for 92 epileptic children (mean age 11.1 years, 50 male, 42 females) and their healthy siblings (mean age 11.1 years, 47 males, 45 females). Details of sleep arrangements and illness severity were obtained. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with high Total SDSC scores in epileptic patients. Results: Compared with their siblings, epileptic children had significantly higher total SDSC score (difference between means 8.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 6.4-11.1) and subscale scores in disorders of initiating and maintaining sleep (3.9, 95% CI 2.8-5.2), sleep-wake transition disorders (2.1, 95% CI 1.3-2.9), sleep-disordered breathing (0.7, 95% CI 0.3-1.1) and disorders of excessive sleepiness (1.5, 95% CI 0.6-2.4). Epileptic children had a higher prevalence of co-sleeping (73.7% vs 31.5%) and on more nights per week (difference between means 3, 95% CI 2.0-3.9) than their siblings. Higher Epilepsy Illness Severity scores were associated with higher total SDSC scores (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Co-sleeping was highly prevalent in children with epilepsy, who also had more sleep disturbances (especially problems with initiating and maintaining sleep and sleep-wake transition disorders) than their siblings. Epilepsy severity contributed to the sleep disturbances. Evaluation of sleep problems should form part of the comprehensive care of children with severe epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-84
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Habits
Epilepsy
Sleep
Siblings
Confidence Intervals
Sleep-Wake Transition Disorders
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Child Care
Caregivers
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Child
  • Epilepsy
  • Sleep disturbance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Sleep habits and disturbances in Malaysian children with epilepsy. / Ong, Lai Choo; Wai Wai, Yang; Wong, Sau Wei; Alsiddiq, Feizel; Khu, Yi Soon.

In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, Vol. 46, No. 3, 03.2010, p. 80-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ong, Lai Choo ; Wai Wai, Yang ; Wong, Sau Wei ; Alsiddiq, Feizel ; Khu, Yi Soon. / Sleep habits and disturbances in Malaysian children with epilepsy. In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health. 2010 ; Vol. 46, No. 3. pp. 80-84.
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