Sleep deprivation is related to obesity and low intake of energy and carbohydrates among working Iranian adults: A cross sectional study

Kolsoom Parvaneh, Bee Koon Poh, Majid Hajifaraji, Mohd Noor Ismail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sleep deficiency is becoming widespread in both adults and adolescents and is accompanied by certain behaviors that can lead to obesity. This study aims to investigate differences in sleep duration of overweight/obese and normal weight groups, and the association between sleep deprivation and obesity, dietary intake and physical activity. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 226 Iranian working adults (109 men and 117 women) aged 20 to 55 years old who live in Tehran. Body weight, height, waist and hip circumferences were measured, and BMI was calculated. Questionnaires, including the Sleep Habit Heart Questionnaire (SHHQ), International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and 24-hour dietary recall, were interview-administered. Subjects were categorized as normal weight (36.3%) or overweight/obese (63.7%) based on WHO standards (2000). Overweight/ obese subjects slept significantly (p<0.001) later (00:32±00:62 AM) and had shorter sleep duration (5.37±1.1 hours) than normal weight subjects (23:30±00:47 PM and 6.54±1.06 hours, respectively). Sleep duration showed significant (p<0.05) direct correlations to energy (r = 0.174), carbohydrate (r = 0.154) and fat intake (r = 0.141). This study revealed that each hour later in bedtime (going to bed later) increased the odds of being overweight or obese by 2.59-fold (95% CI: 1.61-4.16). The findings in this study confirm that people with shorter sleep duration are more likely to be overweight or obese; hence, strategies for the management of obesity should incorporate a consideration of sleep patterns.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-90
Number of pages7
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Sleep Deprivation
Energy Intake
Sleep
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Carbohydrates
Weights and Measures
Exercise
Body Height
Waist Circumference
Habits
Hip
Fats
Body Weight
Interviews
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Body weight
  • Dietary intake
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity
  • Sleep deprivation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Sleep deprivation is related to obesity and low intake of energy and carbohydrates among working Iranian adults : A cross sectional study. / Parvaneh, Kolsoom; Poh, Bee Koon; Hajifaraji, Majid; Ismail, Mohd Noor.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 23, No. 1, 03.2014, p. 84-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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