Skin friction coefficient and boundary layer trend on UKM Aster i-Bond

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study concerns with aerodynamic drag on a passenger car. By using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method, we found that values of skin friction coefficients for three different parts of the car: front, top and rear parts, are different. This study addresses three different basic possible flows around a car: favourable, zero and adverse pressure gradients. Generally, cars use approximately 20% of their engine power to overcome aerodynamic drag, which is generally proportional to the frontal area. The boundary layer at each position has been analyzed to ascertain the effect of wall shear stress on the car surface. It is found that the value of wall shear stress velocity is highest at the rear part, followed by front and top parts. Subsequently, it is shown that the front part has the thinnest viscous region despite not being the part with the highest local ambient velocity compared with the top and rear parts. Despite its supposed aerodynamic shape, the rear part of the car sees separation of flow and the total drag per unit area here is the largest, twice as large as front part and more than seven times larger than the top part.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationApplied Mechanics and Materials
PublisherTrans Tech Publications Ltd
Pages450-455
Number of pages6
Volume629
ISBN (Print)9783038352327, 9783038352327
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event5th AEROTECH conference - Kuala Lumpur
Duration: 29 Oct 201430 Oct 2014

Publication series

NameApplied Mechanics and Materials
Volume629
ISSN (Print)16609336
ISSN (Electronic)16627482

Other

Other5th AEROTECH conference
CityKuala Lumpur
Period29/10/1430/10/14

Fingerprint

Skin friction
Boundary layers
Railroad cars
Aerodynamic drag
Shear stress
Passenger cars
Pressure gradient
Drag
Aerodynamics
Computational fluid dynamics
Engines

Keywords

  • Aerodynamic
  • Boundary layer
  • Skin friction coefficient
  • Wall shear stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Harun, Z., Musa, M. S., Mohammad Rasani, M. R., Abdullah, S., Zulkifli, R., Wan Mahmood, W. M. F., ... Abbas, A. A. (2014). Skin friction coefficient and boundary layer trend on UKM Aster i-Bond. In Applied Mechanics and Materials (Vol. 629, pp. 450-455). (Applied Mechanics and Materials; Vol. 629). Trans Tech Publications Ltd. https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.629.450

Skin friction coefficient and boundary layer trend on UKM Aster i-Bond. / Harun, Zambri; Musa, Muhammad Syafiq; Mohammad Rasani, Mohammad Rasidi; Abdullah, Shahrum; Zulkifli, Rozli; Wan Mahmood, Wan Mohd Faizal; Ghazali, Mariyam Jameelah; Azhari, Che Husna; Abu Mansor, Mohd Radzi; Zainol Abidin, Zulkhairi; Abbas, Ashraf Amer.

Applied Mechanics and Materials. Vol. 629 Trans Tech Publications Ltd, 2014. p. 450-455 (Applied Mechanics and Materials; Vol. 629).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Harun, Z, Musa, MS, Mohammad Rasani, MR, Abdullah, S, Zulkifli, R, Wan Mahmood, WMF, Ghazali, MJ, Azhari, CH, Abu Mansor, MR, Zainol Abidin, Z & Abbas, AA 2014, Skin friction coefficient and boundary layer trend on UKM Aster i-Bond. in Applied Mechanics and Materials. vol. 629, Applied Mechanics and Materials, vol. 629, Trans Tech Publications Ltd, pp. 450-455, 5th AEROTECH conference, Kuala Lumpur, 29/10/14. https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.629.450
Harun Z, Musa MS, Mohammad Rasani MR, Abdullah S, Zulkifli R, Wan Mahmood WMF et al. Skin friction coefficient and boundary layer trend on UKM Aster i-Bond. In Applied Mechanics and Materials. Vol. 629. Trans Tech Publications Ltd. 2014. p. 450-455. (Applied Mechanics and Materials). https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.629.450
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