Simultaneous removal of ammonium and manganese in slow sand biofilter (SSB) by naturally grown bacteria from lake water and its diverse microbial community

Fuzieah Subari, Mohd Aidil Kamaruzzaman, Siti Rozaimah Sheikh Abdullah, Hassimi Abu Hasan, Ahmad Razi Othman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ammonium and manganese may cause the aesthetic deterioration of drinking water quality if their penetration into the water intake is not controlled. The current physical chemical methods may be unable to treat polluted raw water alone, so a biological method is used to bolster the current physical capabilities. In this study, the biological removal of ammonium and manganese was performed using a slow sand biofilter (SSB) and optimized based on a central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM). RSM was used to study the interaction among the process variables, namely, the feed concentration of ammonium (NH4-N) and manganese (Mn), the aeration rate (AR) and retention time (RT). The optimum conditions suggested by the response model were 2.01 mg NH4-N/L and 3 mg Mn/L feed concentrations, a 6 L/min AR and a 9.45 h RT. The condition resulted in an 89% and 98% reduction of ammonium and manganese, respectively. The microbial community attached on the SSB was identified using a polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method. Eight strains were obtained and identified as closest to Clostridium sp., Desnuesiella sp., Aeromonas sp., Pseudoalteromonas sp., Romboutsia sp., and Plasticicumulans sp. Of the bacteria identified in the community, Aeromonas sp. is known to have the ability to oxidize ammonium, and Pseudoalteromonas sp. is involved in oxidation of soluble Mn2+ to insoluble Mn4+.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6351-6358
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Environmental Chemical Engineering
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

Biofilters
Manganese
Ammonium Compounds
lake water
Lakes
microbial community
manganese
Bacteria
Sand
ammonium
bacterium
sand
Water
aeration
biological method
Clostridium
Polymerase chain reaction
chemical method
Electrophoresis
esthetics

Keywords

  • Ammonium removal
  • Drinking water treatment plant
  • Manganese removal
  • Slow sand biofilter (SSB)
  • Surface water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution
  • Process Chemistry and Technology

Cite this

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title = "Simultaneous removal of ammonium and manganese in slow sand biofilter (SSB) by naturally grown bacteria from lake water and its diverse microbial community",
abstract = "Ammonium and manganese may cause the aesthetic deterioration of drinking water quality if their penetration into the water intake is not controlled. The current physical chemical methods may be unable to treat polluted raw water alone, so a biological method is used to bolster the current physical capabilities. In this study, the biological removal of ammonium and manganese was performed using a slow sand biofilter (SSB) and optimized based on a central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM). RSM was used to study the interaction among the process variables, namely, the feed concentration of ammonium (NH4-N) and manganese (Mn), the aeration rate (AR) and retention time (RT). The optimum conditions suggested by the response model were 2.01 mg NH4-N/L and 3 mg Mn/L feed concentrations, a 6 L/min AR and a 9.45 h RT. The condition resulted in an 89{\%} and 98{\%} reduction of ammonium and manganese, respectively. The microbial community attached on the SSB was identified using a polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method. Eight strains were obtained and identified as closest to Clostridium sp., Desnuesiella sp., Aeromonas sp., Pseudoalteromonas sp., Romboutsia sp., and Plasticicumulans sp. Of the bacteria identified in the community, Aeromonas sp. is known to have the ability to oxidize ammonium, and Pseudoalteromonas sp. is involved in oxidation of soluble Mn2+ to insoluble Mn4+.",
keywords = "Ammonium removal, Drinking water treatment plant, Manganese removal, Slow sand biofilter (SSB), Surface water",
author = "Fuzieah Subari and Kamaruzzaman, {Mohd Aidil} and {Sheikh Abdullah}, {Siti Rozaimah} and {Abu Hasan}, Hassimi and Othman, {Ahmad Razi}",
year = "2018",
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T1 - Simultaneous removal of ammonium and manganese in slow sand biofilter (SSB) by naturally grown bacteria from lake water and its diverse microbial community

AU - Subari, Fuzieah

AU - Kamaruzzaman, Mohd Aidil

AU - Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah

AU - Abu Hasan, Hassimi

AU - Othman, Ahmad Razi

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Ammonium and manganese may cause the aesthetic deterioration of drinking water quality if their penetration into the water intake is not controlled. The current physical chemical methods may be unable to treat polluted raw water alone, so a biological method is used to bolster the current physical capabilities. In this study, the biological removal of ammonium and manganese was performed using a slow sand biofilter (SSB) and optimized based on a central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM). RSM was used to study the interaction among the process variables, namely, the feed concentration of ammonium (NH4-N) and manganese (Mn), the aeration rate (AR) and retention time (RT). The optimum conditions suggested by the response model were 2.01 mg NH4-N/L and 3 mg Mn/L feed concentrations, a 6 L/min AR and a 9.45 h RT. The condition resulted in an 89% and 98% reduction of ammonium and manganese, respectively. The microbial community attached on the SSB was identified using a polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method. Eight strains were obtained and identified as closest to Clostridium sp., Desnuesiella sp., Aeromonas sp., Pseudoalteromonas sp., Romboutsia sp., and Plasticicumulans sp. Of the bacteria identified in the community, Aeromonas sp. is known to have the ability to oxidize ammonium, and Pseudoalteromonas sp. is involved in oxidation of soluble Mn2+ to insoluble Mn4+.

AB - Ammonium and manganese may cause the aesthetic deterioration of drinking water quality if their penetration into the water intake is not controlled. The current physical chemical methods may be unable to treat polluted raw water alone, so a biological method is used to bolster the current physical capabilities. In this study, the biological removal of ammonium and manganese was performed using a slow sand biofilter (SSB) and optimized based on a central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM). RSM was used to study the interaction among the process variables, namely, the feed concentration of ammonium (NH4-N) and manganese (Mn), the aeration rate (AR) and retention time (RT). The optimum conditions suggested by the response model were 2.01 mg NH4-N/L and 3 mg Mn/L feed concentrations, a 6 L/min AR and a 9.45 h RT. The condition resulted in an 89% and 98% reduction of ammonium and manganese, respectively. The microbial community attached on the SSB was identified using a polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method. Eight strains were obtained and identified as closest to Clostridium sp., Desnuesiella sp., Aeromonas sp., Pseudoalteromonas sp., Romboutsia sp., and Plasticicumulans sp. Of the bacteria identified in the community, Aeromonas sp. is known to have the ability to oxidize ammonium, and Pseudoalteromonas sp. is involved in oxidation of soluble Mn2+ to insoluble Mn4+.

KW - Ammonium removal

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KW - Manganese removal

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KW - Surface water

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