Simultaneous coffee caffeine intake and sleep deprivation alter glucose homeostasis in Iranian men: A randomized crossover trial

Behrouz Rasaei, Ruzita Abd. Talib, Mohd Ismail Noor, Majid Karandish, Norimah A. Karim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Sleep deprivation and coffee caffeine consumption have been shown to affect glu-cose homeostasis separately, but the combined effects of these two variables are unknown. Methods and Study Design: Forty-two healthy Iranian men, aged 20-40 years old, were assigned to three groups in a randomised crossover trial involving three treatments with two-week washout periods. Subjects were moderate coffee con-sumers (≤3 cups/day), and had a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index ≤5. Each treatment involved three nights of de-prived sleep (4 hrs. in bed) plus 3×150 cc/cup of boiled water (BW treatment), decaffeinated coffee (DC treat-ment, without sugar, 99.9% caffeine-free), and caffeinated coffee (CC treatment, without sugar, 65 mg caf-feine/cup). DC and CC treatments were blinded. At the end of each treatment, fasting serum glucose (using en-zyme assays) and insulin (using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay) were measured and, again, two hours after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Insulin resistance was quantified with the homeostasis model. Re-sults: Repeated measures ANOVA indicated no significant difference between the treatments in fasting serum glucose (p=0.248) or insulin resistance (p=0.079). However, ANOVA demonstrated differences between treat-ments in fasting serum insulin (p=0.004) and glucose, as well as insulin after OGTT (p < 0.001). Pairwise compar-isons test (within subjects) showed that the CC treatment yielded higher serum glucose and insulin after OGTT (p < 0.001), higher fasting serum insulin (p=0.001), and increased insulin resistance (p=0.039) as compared to the DC treatment. Conclusions: Thus caffeinated coffee was more adverse for glucose homeostasis compared to de-caffeinated coffee in individuals who were simultaneously sleep deprived.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)729-739
Number of pages11
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Sleep Deprivation
Coffee
Caffeine
Cross-Over Studies
Homeostasis
Glucose
Insulin
Fasting
Glucose Tolerance Test
Insulin Resistance
Serum
Sleep
Therapeutics
Analysis of Variance
Water Purification
Immunoassay

Keywords

  • Coffee caffeine
  • Glucose homeostasis
  • Sleep deprivation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Simultaneous coffee caffeine intake and sleep deprivation alter glucose homeostasis in Iranian men : A randomized crossover trial. / Rasaei, Behrouz; Abd. Talib, Ruzita; Noor, Mohd Ismail; Karandish, Majid; A. Karim, Norimah.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 25, No. 4, 2016, p. 729-739.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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