Simulated hyperopic anisometropia and reading, visual information processing, and reading-related eye movement performance in children

Sumithira Narayanasamy, Stephen J. Vincent, Geoff P. Sampson, Joanne M. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated the impact of simulated hyperopic anisometropia and sustained near work on performance of academic-related measures in children.

Methods: Participants included 16 children (mean age: 11.1 ± 0.8 years) with minimal refractive error. Academic-related outcome measures included a reading test (Neale Analysis of Reading Ability), visual information–processing tests (Coding and Symbol Search subtests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children), and a reading-related eye movement test (Developmental Eye Movement test). Performance was assessed with and without 0.75 diopters of simulated monocular hyperopic defocus (administered in a randomized order), before and after 20 minutes of sustained near work. Unilateral hyperopic defocus was systematically assigned to either the dominant or nondominant sighting eye to evaluate the impact of ocular dominance on any performance decrements.

Results: Simulated hyperopic anisometropia and sustained near work both independently reduced performance on all of the outcome measures (P < 0.001). A significant interaction was also observed between simulated anisometropia and near work (P < 0.05), with the greatest decrement in performance observed during simulated anisometropia in combination with sustained near work. Laterality of the refractive error simulation (ocular dominance) did not significantly influence the outcome measures (P > 0.05). A reduction of up to 12% in performance was observed across the range of academic-related measures following sustained near work undertaken during the anisometropic simulation.

Conclusions: Simulated hyperopic anisometropia significantly impaired academic-related performance, particularly in combination with sustained near work. The impact of uncorrected habitual anisometropia on academic-related performance in children requires further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8015-8023
Number of pages9
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume55
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Nov 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Anisometropia
Eye Movements
Automatic Data Processing
Reading
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
ocular Dominance
Wechsler Scales
Aptitude
Refractive Errors
Intelligence

Keywords

  • Anisometropia
  • Eye movements
  • Ocular dominance
  • Reading performance
  • Visual information processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Simulated hyperopic anisometropia and reading, visual information processing, and reading-related eye movement performance in children. / Narayanasamy, Sumithira; Vincent, Stephen J.; Sampson, Geoff P.; Wood, Joanne M.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 55, No. 12, 20.11.2014, p. 8015-8023.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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