Short term nasogastric versus oral feeding in hospitalised patients with advanced cirrhosis: A randomised trial

Mei Ling Sharon Tai, Hamizah Razlan, Khean Lee Goh, Siti Hawa Mohd Taib, Abdul Halim Mohd Huzaini, Sanjay Rampal, Sanjiv Mahadeva

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background & aims: The benefit of short term nasogastric (NG) feeding over oral supplementation in advanced cirrhosis remains uncertain. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was designed to ascertain this information. Methods: A randomized trial of NG versus oral feeding was conducted in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. Nutritional parameters and Child-Pugh score changes at 2 weeks, with follow up measurements in 6 weeks, were assessed. Results: 52 patients (mean age 58.9 years ± 12.2 years, 38.5% females) with similar baseline parameters were randomized to NG (n = 28) or oral feeding (n = 24) between August 2007 and May 2010. At 2 weeks, there was a higher caloric intake in the NG group (1721 ± 599 kCal vs 1346 ± 448 kCal, p = 0.015), but no significant improvement in anthropometry (MAMC mean difference 0.35 ± 1.82 NG vs -0.60 ± 1.88 oral), biochemistry (serum transferrin mean difference 0.81 ± 3.55 NG vs 0.04 ± 0.30 oral) or CP scores (mean difference -0.68 ± 1.14 NG vs -0.43 ± 1.29 oral), and this was maintained at 6 weeks' follow up. 12/28 (42.9%) patients had poor tolerance (VAS score < 50) to the NG tube placement. Nine patients (four NG, five oral) suffered mortality prior to the 6 weeks follow up. Conclusion: Short term NG feeding is poorly tolerated and confers little benefit over oral feeding in hospitalized patients with advanced cirrhosis.

    Original languageEnglish
    Journale-SPEN
    Volume6
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

    Fingerprint

    Fibrosis
    Anthropometry
    Transferrin
    Energy Intake
    Liver Cirrhosis
    Biochemistry
    Randomized Controlled Trials
    Mortality
    Serum

    Keywords

    • Chronic liver disease
    • Enteral nutrition
    • Liver cirrhosis
    • Nutrition intervention nasogastric feeding

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

    Cite this

    Tai, M. L. S., Razlan, H., Goh, K. L., Mohd Taib, S. H., Huzaini, A. H. M., Rampal, S., & Mahadeva, S. (2011). Short term nasogastric versus oral feeding in hospitalised patients with advanced cirrhosis: A randomised trial. e-SPEN, 6(6). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eclnm.2011.10.001

    Short term nasogastric versus oral feeding in hospitalised patients with advanced cirrhosis : A randomised trial. / Tai, Mei Ling Sharon; Razlan, Hamizah; Goh, Khean Lee; Mohd Taib, Siti Hawa; Huzaini, Abdul Halim Mohd; Rampal, Sanjay; Mahadeva, Sanjiv.

    In: e-SPEN, Vol. 6, No. 6, 12.2011.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Tai, MLS, Razlan, H, Goh, KL, Mohd Taib, SH, Huzaini, AHM, Rampal, S & Mahadeva, S 2011, 'Short term nasogastric versus oral feeding in hospitalised patients with advanced cirrhosis: A randomised trial', e-SPEN, vol. 6, no. 6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eclnm.2011.10.001
    Tai, Mei Ling Sharon ; Razlan, Hamizah ; Goh, Khean Lee ; Mohd Taib, Siti Hawa ; Huzaini, Abdul Halim Mohd ; Rampal, Sanjay ; Mahadeva, Sanjiv. / Short term nasogastric versus oral feeding in hospitalised patients with advanced cirrhosis : A randomised trial. In: e-SPEN. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 6.
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    abstract = "Background & aims: The benefit of short term nasogastric (NG) feeding over oral supplementation in advanced cirrhosis remains uncertain. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was designed to ascertain this information. Methods: A randomized trial of NG versus oral feeding was conducted in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. Nutritional parameters and Child-Pugh score changes at 2 weeks, with follow up measurements in 6 weeks, were assessed. Results: 52 patients (mean age 58.9 years ± 12.2 years, 38.5{\%} females) with similar baseline parameters were randomized to NG (n = 28) or oral feeding (n = 24) between August 2007 and May 2010. At 2 weeks, there was a higher caloric intake in the NG group (1721 ± 599 kCal vs 1346 ± 448 kCal, p = 0.015), but no significant improvement in anthropometry (MAMC mean difference 0.35 ± 1.82 NG vs -0.60 ± 1.88 oral), biochemistry (serum transferrin mean difference 0.81 ± 3.55 NG vs 0.04 ± 0.30 oral) or CP scores (mean difference -0.68 ± 1.14 NG vs -0.43 ± 1.29 oral), and this was maintained at 6 weeks' follow up. 12/28 (42.9{\%}) patients had poor tolerance (VAS score < 50) to the NG tube placement. Nine patients (four NG, five oral) suffered mortality prior to the 6 weeks follow up. Conclusion: Short term NG feeding is poorly tolerated and confers little benefit over oral feeding in hospitalized patients with advanced cirrhosis.",
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    AU - Goh, Khean Lee

    AU - Mohd Taib, Siti Hawa

    AU - Huzaini, Abdul Halim Mohd

    AU - Rampal, Sanjay

    AU - Mahadeva, Sanjiv

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    N2 - Background & aims: The benefit of short term nasogastric (NG) feeding over oral supplementation in advanced cirrhosis remains uncertain. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was designed to ascertain this information. Methods: A randomized trial of NG versus oral feeding was conducted in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. Nutritional parameters and Child-Pugh score changes at 2 weeks, with follow up measurements in 6 weeks, were assessed. Results: 52 patients (mean age 58.9 years ± 12.2 years, 38.5% females) with similar baseline parameters were randomized to NG (n = 28) or oral feeding (n = 24) between August 2007 and May 2010. At 2 weeks, there was a higher caloric intake in the NG group (1721 ± 599 kCal vs 1346 ± 448 kCal, p = 0.015), but no significant improvement in anthropometry (MAMC mean difference 0.35 ± 1.82 NG vs -0.60 ± 1.88 oral), biochemistry (serum transferrin mean difference 0.81 ± 3.55 NG vs 0.04 ± 0.30 oral) or CP scores (mean difference -0.68 ± 1.14 NG vs -0.43 ± 1.29 oral), and this was maintained at 6 weeks' follow up. 12/28 (42.9%) patients had poor tolerance (VAS score < 50) to the NG tube placement. Nine patients (four NG, five oral) suffered mortality prior to the 6 weeks follow up. Conclusion: Short term NG feeding is poorly tolerated and confers little benefit over oral feeding in hospitalized patients with advanced cirrhosis.

    AB - Background & aims: The benefit of short term nasogastric (NG) feeding over oral supplementation in advanced cirrhosis remains uncertain. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was designed to ascertain this information. Methods: A randomized trial of NG versus oral feeding was conducted in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. Nutritional parameters and Child-Pugh score changes at 2 weeks, with follow up measurements in 6 weeks, were assessed. Results: 52 patients (mean age 58.9 years ± 12.2 years, 38.5% females) with similar baseline parameters were randomized to NG (n = 28) or oral feeding (n = 24) between August 2007 and May 2010. At 2 weeks, there was a higher caloric intake in the NG group (1721 ± 599 kCal vs 1346 ± 448 kCal, p = 0.015), but no significant improvement in anthropometry (MAMC mean difference 0.35 ± 1.82 NG vs -0.60 ± 1.88 oral), biochemistry (serum transferrin mean difference 0.81 ± 3.55 NG vs 0.04 ± 0.30 oral) or CP scores (mean difference -0.68 ± 1.14 NG vs -0.43 ± 1.29 oral), and this was maintained at 6 weeks' follow up. 12/28 (42.9%) patients had poor tolerance (VAS score < 50) to the NG tube placement. Nine patients (four NG, five oral) suffered mortality prior to the 6 weeks follow up. Conclusion: Short term NG feeding is poorly tolerated and confers little benefit over oral feeding in hospitalized patients with advanced cirrhosis.

    KW - Chronic liver disease

    KW - Enteral nutrition

    KW - Liver cirrhosis

    KW - Nutrition intervention nasogastric feeding

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