Shifting discourses in social sciences: Nexus of knowledge and power

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Developing societies have often relied on Western or Eurocentric knowledge as a consequence of colonization process, intellectual imperialism, as well as experiences of the forces of modernization and its dependencies, as well as globalization rhetoric. The basic premise of this article is that all civilizations have potential sources of social science theorizing. This article explicates the general development of social sciences discourses in the West and response from the developing societies in particular. Specifically the article attempts to elaborate on the impasse in social science as it relates to domination of Eurocentric knowledge and the marginalization of local knowledge. In framing this article, insights on captive mind by Alatas and the notion of modern power by Foucault are utilized. Our approach to power and knowledge involves a multi-scalar analysis of the functioning of power relations that impinged on the social science discipline as experienced in the developing societies. Contestations from within the Western realm as well as developing societies appear to provide a remedy to the contemporary situation, but somewhat at a slow pace and operating in the margins. The relevance of adapting to local context and the institutional capacity for self-empowerment in localizing knowledge is a necessary path that developing societies should take.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-106
Number of pages10
JournalAsian Social Science
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2013

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social science
discourse
society
imperialism
colonization
domination
civilization
remedies
modernization
empowerment
rhetoric
Discourse
Social Sciences
Nexus
Social sciences
globalization
experience
Eurocentric

Keywords

  • Captive mind
  • Localization of knowledge
  • Modern power
  • Social sciences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

Cite this

Shifting discourses in social sciences : Nexus of knowledge and power. / V. Selvadurai, Sivapalan; Er, Ah Choy; Maros, Marlyna; Abdullah, Kamarulnizam.

In: Asian Social Science, Vol. 9, No. 7, 01.06.2013, p. 97-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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