Service failure, service recovery and critical incident outcomes in the public transport sector

Aliah Hanim M Salleh, Maisarah Ahmad, Che Aniza Che Wel, Nur Sa adah Muhamad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

What are the underlying incidents that led to either satisfactory or dissatisfactory experience of passengers using transport services? How effective are recovery activities to generate positive outcomes? This study hopes to fill the gap in this understudied area by examining the link between service failure and service recovery efforts with critical incident outcomes in the Malaysian passenger transport sector. A total of 81 written accounts of these critical incidents was content analysed through data obtained from interviews with passengers in this sector. It is found that Bitner, Booms & Tetrault. (1990)'s classification scheme is a useful diagnostic tool for passenger transport in Malaysia. However, only eleven out of the twelve critical incident categories from the three groups, are found. Interestingly, more incidents are judged 'dissatisfactory' (n=55) than 'satisfactory' (n=26). The largest group (Group 1) at 53.1% of the total 81 incidents, involved incidents to do with how transport providers responded to the service delivery system failure, with 'response to unreasonably slow service' accounting for 22.2% of the total. The second and third most frequent incidents also fall under Group 1 - those related to 'response to other core service failures' and 'response to unavailable service', followed by the category related to 'employee behaviour in the context of cultural norm' from Group 3. The second largest group (Group 3), comprising 38.3% of the total concerns incidents with 'unprompted and unsolicited employee action'. Only seven incidents involved 'employee response to customer need and request' (Group 2), indicating the regulated nature of passenger transport services in Malaysia that are less likely open to customisation and accommodation of customer requests.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-58
Number of pages13
JournalMalaysian Journal of Consumer and Family Economics
Volume14
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Critical incidents
Incidents
Public transport
Service failure
Service recovery
Passenger transport
Large groups
Malaysia
Employees
Customer needs
Employee behaviour
Diagnostics
Customization
Service delivery systems
System failure
Classification schemes
Accommodation

Keywords

  • Critical incidents
  • Public transport sector
  • Service failure and recovery
  • Service satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

Cite this

Service failure, service recovery and critical incident outcomes in the public transport sector. / Salleh, Aliah Hanim M; Ahmad, Maisarah; Che Wel, Che Aniza; Muhamad, Nur Sa adah.

In: Malaysian Journal of Consumer and Family Economics, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2011, p. 46-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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