Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in malnutrition: preliminary results.

A. Osman, B. A. Khalid, T. T. Tan, W. M. Wan Nazaimoon, Loo Ling Wu, M. L. Ng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is a report of a cross sectional study involving 3 groups of children, moderately malnourished (BMI < 15), mildly malnourished (BMI 15-18) and well nourished (BMI > 18) to determine the differences in hormonal and biochemical parameters between the groups. The children were of age range from 7-17 years old. The children were from the same area with exposure to the same food, drinking water and environment. There were significant differences in the nutritional indices between the three groups. No differences were observed in levels of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and T3:T4 ratio. Significant difference however was found in the TSH levels using highly sensitive IRMA TSH assays. Moderately malnourished children had higher TSH levels (p < 0.05) compared to mildly malnourished and well-nourished children. No difference was found between the mildly malnourished and well-nourished groups. There were no significant differences in serum cortisols done at similar times, fasting growth hormone and calcium. Serum alanine transminase (ALT) however was higher in moderately malnourished than in well-nourished children. Thus using highly sensitive IRMA TSH assays, we were able to detect differences in TSH levels even though T3, T4 and T3:T4 ratio, cortisol, growth hormone and calcium were normal, implying in moderately malnourished children, a higher TSH drive to maintain euthyroid state.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-228
Number of pages4
JournalSingapore Medical Journal
Volume34
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1993

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Thyrotropin
Malnutrition
Serum
Growth Hormone
Hydrocortisone
Calcium
Nutrition Assessment
Triiodothyronine
Thyroxine
Drinking Water
Alanine
Fasting
Cross-Sectional Studies
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Osman, A., Khalid, B. A., Tan, T. T., Wan Nazaimoon, W. M., Wu, L. L., & Ng, M. L. (1993). Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in malnutrition: preliminary results. Singapore Medical Journal, 34(3), 225-228.

Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in malnutrition : preliminary results. / Osman, A.; Khalid, B. A.; Tan, T. T.; Wan Nazaimoon, W. M.; Wu, Loo Ling; Ng, M. L.

In: Singapore Medical Journal, Vol. 34, No. 3, 06.1993, p. 225-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Osman, A, Khalid, BA, Tan, TT, Wan Nazaimoon, WM, Wu, LL & Ng, ML 1993, 'Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in malnutrition: preliminary results.', Singapore Medical Journal, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 225-228.
Osman A, Khalid BA, Tan TT, Wan Nazaimoon WM, Wu LL, Ng ML. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in malnutrition: preliminary results. Singapore Medical Journal. 1993 Jun;34(3):225-228.
Osman, A. ; Khalid, B. A. ; Tan, T. T. ; Wan Nazaimoon, W. M. ; Wu, Loo Ling ; Ng, M. L. / Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in malnutrition : preliminary results. In: Singapore Medical Journal. 1993 ; Vol. 34, No. 3. pp. 225-228.
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