Serum procalcitonin has negative predictive value for bacterial infection in active systemic lupus erythematosus.

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Abstract

Previous studies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients have produced conflicting results regarding the diagnostic utility of procalcitonin (PCT). The aim of this study was to determine predictive values of PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP) for bacterial infection in SLE patients. This was a cross-sectional study of clinic and hospitalized SLE patients with and without bacterial infection recruited over 18 months. Bacterial infection was defined as positive culture results. SLE disease activity was measured using SLEDAI. PCT and CRP were measured by automated immunoassays. Sixty-eight patients (57 females) were studied. Ten patients (15%) had infection. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for PCT and CRP were not significantly different [0.797 (CI 0.614-0.979) versus 0.755 (CI 0.600-0.910)]. In lupus flare patients, PCT but not CRP was higher with infection (p = 0.019 versus 0.195). A PCT of <0.17 ng/ml ruled out infection with 94% negative predictive value (NPV). In remission patients, CRP but not PCT was elevated with infection (p = 0.036 versus 0.103). CRP < 0.57 mg/dl had 96% NPV. PCT may be a better marker to rule out bacterial infection in lupus flare but not in remission or general screening.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1172-1177
Number of pages6
JournalLupus
Volume21
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

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Calcitonin
Bacterial Infections
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
C-Reactive Protein
Serum
Infection
Immunoassay
ROC Curve
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

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Serum procalcitonin has negative predictive value for bacterial infection in active systemic lupus erythematosus. / Mazlan, Khalidah Adibah; Intan, S.; Hussin, S.; Abdul Gafor, Abdul Halim.

In: Lupus, Vol. 21, No. 11, 10.2012, p. 1172-1177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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