Seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis: Comparative study between migrant workers from the Indian subcontinent and local Malaysian workers

Amal R. Nimir, B. T E Chan, M. I. Noor Hayati, H. Kino, Anisah Nordin, Norhayati Moktar, O. Sulaiman, M. Mohammed Abdullah, M. S. Fatmah, A. R. Roslida, G. Ismail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Primary toxoplasmosis is usually subclinical, but in severely immunocompromised patients it may be life-threatening. For this reason, it could be important to monitor situations related to non-noticeable diseases among foreign arrivals in a country. In this study, we aimed to survey toxoplasmosis among migrants from Indian subcontinent to Malaysia. Methods: In a prospective, observational study, a serological evaluation on toxoplasmosis among 91 migrants from Indian Subcontinent in Malaysia was conducted in a plantation and a detention camp. We used study subject information sheet for demographic information and venous blood samples for serological study to determine Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies. The control group was composed of 198 local Malaysians working in the same plantation and detention camp. Results: The age of study participants ranged from 19-45 years (geometric mean 29.9). Except for the Nepalese, none of these migrants from the Indian Subcontinent were positive for IgM. IgG positive rates among the Nepalese, Indians and Pakistani were 46.2%, 6.6% and 5.9% respectively. All workers from Sri Lanka had 0.0% prevalence rate for both IgG and IgM. The prevalence rates of 44.9% was significantly (p<0.001) higher among local Malaysian workers when compared to migrant workers (18.8%). No significant difference in the prevalence rates was noted among the migrants or local workers when they were grouped according to agricultural and non-agricultural occupations. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that, with the exception of Nepalese population, there is a low frequency of toxoplasmosis infection among migrants from Indian subcontinent to Malaysia. A routine screening for toxoplasmosis may be indicated for sub-groups of migrants in this country.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-15
Number of pages7
JournalNew Iraqi Journal of Medicine
Volume4
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Toxoplasmosis
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Malaysia
Immunoglobulin M
Immunoglobulin G
Sri Lanka
Toxoplasma
Immunocompromised Host
Occupations
Observational Studies
Demography
Prospective Studies
Control Groups
Antibodies
Infection
Population

Keywords

  • Indian subcontinent
  • Malaysia
  • Migrants
  • Toxoplasmosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis : Comparative study between migrant workers from the Indian subcontinent and local Malaysian workers. / Nimir, Amal R.; Chan, B. T E; Noor Hayati, M. I.; Kino, H.; Nordin, Anisah; Moktar, Norhayati; Sulaiman, O.; Mohammed Abdullah, M.; Fatmah, M. S.; Roslida, A. R.; Ismail, G.

In: New Iraqi Journal of Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2008, p. 9-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nimir, AR, Chan, BTE, Noor Hayati, MI, Kino, H, Nordin, A, Moktar, N, Sulaiman, O, Mohammed Abdullah, M, Fatmah, MS, Roslida, AR & Ismail, G 2008, 'Seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis: Comparative study between migrant workers from the Indian subcontinent and local Malaysian workers', New Iraqi Journal of Medicine, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 9-15.
Nimir, Amal R. ; Chan, B. T E ; Noor Hayati, M. I. ; Kino, H. ; Nordin, Anisah ; Moktar, Norhayati ; Sulaiman, O. ; Mohammed Abdullah, M. ; Fatmah, M. S. ; Roslida, A. R. ; Ismail, G. / Seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis : Comparative study between migrant workers from the Indian subcontinent and local Malaysian workers. In: New Iraqi Journal of Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 9-15.
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T2 - Comparative study between migrant workers from the Indian subcontinent and local Malaysian workers

AU - Nimir, Amal R.

AU - Chan, B. T E

AU - Noor Hayati, M. I.

AU - Kino, H.

AU - Nordin, Anisah

AU - Moktar, Norhayati

AU - Sulaiman, O.

AU - Mohammed Abdullah, M.

AU - Fatmah, M. S.

AU - Roslida, A. R.

AU - Ismail, G.

PY - 2008

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N2 - Background: Primary toxoplasmosis is usually subclinical, but in severely immunocompromised patients it may be life-threatening. For this reason, it could be important to monitor situations related to non-noticeable diseases among foreign arrivals in a country. In this study, we aimed to survey toxoplasmosis among migrants from Indian subcontinent to Malaysia. Methods: In a prospective, observational study, a serological evaluation on toxoplasmosis among 91 migrants from Indian Subcontinent in Malaysia was conducted in a plantation and a detention camp. We used study subject information sheet for demographic information and venous blood samples for serological study to determine Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies. The control group was composed of 198 local Malaysians working in the same plantation and detention camp. Results: The age of study participants ranged from 19-45 years (geometric mean 29.9). Except for the Nepalese, none of these migrants from the Indian Subcontinent were positive for IgM. IgG positive rates among the Nepalese, Indians and Pakistani were 46.2%, 6.6% and 5.9% respectively. All workers from Sri Lanka had 0.0% prevalence rate for both IgG and IgM. The prevalence rates of 44.9% was significantly (p<0.001) higher among local Malaysian workers when compared to migrant workers (18.8%). No significant difference in the prevalence rates was noted among the migrants or local workers when they were grouped according to agricultural and non-agricultural occupations. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that, with the exception of Nepalese population, there is a low frequency of toxoplasmosis infection among migrants from Indian subcontinent to Malaysia. A routine screening for toxoplasmosis may be indicated for sub-groups of migrants in this country.

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