Screening of lead exposure among workers in Selangor and Federal Territory in Malaysia

Salmijah Surif, Cheok Yun Chai

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The study of lead exposure among workers in Selangor and the Federal Territory was carried out based on the δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) level in urine. Occupations which are expected to have higher lead exposure were chosen in this research. The ALA level in the workers' urine was linked to a few variables which may contribute to the lead level in the body. The result of this study showed that the ALA level of the urine of university students (0·352 ± 0·038 mg/100 ml) < clerical staff (0·560 ± 0·043 mg/100 ml) < traffic police (0·612 ± 0·064 mg/100 ml) < vehicle workshop workers (0·673 ± 0·099 mg/100 ml) < petrol kiosk workers (0·717 ± 0·069 mg/100 ml) < bus drivers/conductors (0·850 ± 0·055 mg/100 ml) which was similar to workers in the printing industry (0·852 ± 0·110 mg/100 ml). The ALA levels in the urine of the exposed workers were significantly different from the control group (university students). However, results obtained from clerical staff revealed that they were also in the exposed group category. Analysis of variance showed that the exposed groups are in a population which is different from the control population. Correlation tests suggest that there is no significant connection between the ALA level in the urine and the variables tested. Furthermore, Duncan's Multiple Range Test showed no significant differences between the smoking/non smoking group, alcoholic/non-alcoholic group, race and sex (p > 0·05).

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)177-181
    Number of pages5
    JournalEnvironmental Pollution
    Volume88
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1995

    Fingerprint

    Aminolevulinic Acid
    Malaysia
    urine
    Screening
    Lead
    Urine
    Acids
    acid
    Occupations
    occupation
    student
    Students
    Research
    exposure
    screening

    Keywords

    • Lead exposure
    • Malaysia
    • urinary δ-aminolevulinic acid
    • workers

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
    • Pollution
    • Toxicology
    • Environmental Science(all)
    • Environmental Chemistry

    Cite this

    Screening of lead exposure among workers in Selangor and Federal Territory in Malaysia. / Surif, Salmijah; Chai, Cheok Yun.

    In: Environmental Pollution, Vol. 88, No. 2, 1995, p. 177-181.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Surif, Salmijah ; Chai, Cheok Yun. / Screening of lead exposure among workers in Selangor and Federal Territory in Malaysia. In: Environmental Pollution. 1995 ; Vol. 88, No. 2. pp. 177-181.
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