Screening for potential biosurfactant producing bacteria from hydrocarbon-degrading isolates

Asia Fadhile Almansoory, Mushrifah Idris, Siti Rozaimah Sheikh Abdullah, Nurina Anuar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many microorganisms are able to produce a wide range of amphipathic compounds are surface-active or biosurfactant. In the past decade, biosurfactants has attracted properties like specificity, low toxicity and relative ease of preparation. These properties for reducing dependence over environmentally harsh chemical detergents. This study aims to screen fifteen isolates for gasoline degradation and biosurfactant production. Different screening methods namely drop collapse, oil displacement test, hemolysis test, hydrophobicity; emulsification index and surface tension were used for their efficiency to potent biosurfactant production. All isolates were grown in mineral salt medium with 10% (v/v) of gasoline as carbon sources. Based on the obtained results three bacteria that were considered as efficient bacteria to gasoline degrading were identified from a previous study, however, we have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa 28 is more efficient than Pseudomonas aeruginosa HNYM41 and Serratia marcescens showing average gasoline degradation of 79.7%, 74.5% and 70.9% respectively but 98.4%, 94.6% and 97.2% for adhesion to hydrocarbon. In screening method six isolates showed positive results in drop collapse but the highest displace area for crude oil was given by S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa 28, at 9.43 mm and 9.42 mm. The selected isolate S. marcescens exhibited a high emulsifying activity of 29.2% compared the other species. The biosurfactant production reduced the surface tension of pure water from 69.6 mN/m to the 36.5 mN/m. For this reason among the fifteen isolates studied, S. marcescens was selected for gasoline degrading bacteria and biosurfactant producing. These surface-active increase the surface area of hydrophobic water-insoluble substrates and increase their bioavailability. The maximum biosurfactant production for these isolates could be considered as a potential biosurfactant producer at 0.6 g/L whiles the lower production by isolate Bacillus licheniformis at 0.18 g/L. The major objective of this study is to select potential isolate for gasoline degradation and biosurfactant production to using in environmental application.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)639-647
Number of pages9
JournalAdvances in Environmental Biology
Volume8
Issue number3 SPEC. ISSUE
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

biosurfactants
Gasoline
Hydrocarbons
hydrocarbons
Serratia marcescens
gasoline
surface tension
hydrocarbon
screening
Bacteria
degradation
bacterium
bacteria
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Surface Tension
hydrophobicity
detergent
adhesion
bioavailability
crude oil

Keywords

  • Biodegradation
  • Biosurfactant
  • Emulsification activity
  • Gasoline
  • Surface tension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Screening for potential biosurfactant producing bacteria from hydrocarbon-degrading isolates. / Almansoory, Asia Fadhile; Idris, Mushrifah; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah; Anuar, Nurina.

In: Advances in Environmental Biology, Vol. 8, No. 3 SPEC. ISSUE, 2014, p. 639-647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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