Safe-water shortages, gender perspectives, and related challenges in developing countries

The case of Uganda

David Baguma, Jamal H. Hashim, Syed Mohamed Al-Junid Syed Junid, Willibald Loiskandl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The need for water continues to become more acute with the changing requirements of an expanding world population. Using a logistical analysis of data from 301 respondents from households that harvest rainwater in Uganda, the relationship between dependent variables, such as water management performed as female-dominated practices, and independent variables, such as years of water harvesting, family size, tank operation and maintenance, and the presence of local associations, was investigated. The number of years of water harvesting, family size, tank operation and maintenance, and presence of local associations were statistically significantly related to adequate efficient water management. The number of years of water harvesting was linked to women's participation in household chores more than to the participation of men, the way of livelihoods lived for many years. Large families were concurrent with a reduction in water shortages, partially because of the availability of active labour. The findings also reveal important information regarding water-related operations and maintenance at the household level and the presence of local associations that could contribute some of the information necessary to minimise water-related health risks. Overall, this investigation revealed important observations about the water management carried out by women with respect to underlying safe-water shortages, gender perspectives, and related challenges in Uganda that can be of great importance to developing countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-102
Number of pages7
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume442
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Uganda
Developing countries
Developing Countries
gender
developing world
Water
Water management
water management
water
Maintenance
Health risks
rainwater
health risk
labor
Availability
Personnel

Keywords

  • Active labour
  • Associations
  • Population
  • Rainwater
  • Water management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Safe-water shortages, gender perspectives, and related challenges in developing countries : The case of Uganda. / Baguma, David; Hashim, Jamal H.; Syed Junid, Syed Mohamed Al-Junid; Loiskandl, Willibald.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 442, 2013, p. 96-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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