Safe water, household income and health challenges in Ugandan homes that harvest rainwater

David Baguma, Jamal H. Hashim, Syed Mohamed Al-Junid Syed Junid, Michael Hauser, Helmut Jung, Willibald Loiskandl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Having access to a safe water supply is important to improve a person's quality of life. We examine the relationship between the influence of water availability on monthly household expenditures (the dependent variable) and independent variables such as household characteristics, tank size, usage instructions and post-construction guidance, including the management of water-related health risks. The sample consisted of 301 respondents who harvest rainwater in Uganda. A multiple regression analysis was used to analyse the data. The findings show that post-construction guidance and tank size were significant variables. This study suggests the need for a follow-up to improve health after the installation of water supply equipment, i.e., to provide information about water risks, foster reading norms and facilitate the availability and affordabilityofinformation sources, e.g., subsidised newspapers and information support devices (computers). Additionally, this study shows the possibility of increased savings due to reduced expenditures on water from vendors and the management of water-related health risks caused by a water shortage, e.g., dehydration. Overall, the study reveals two possible ways to advance policy and health in developing countries: (1) ensuring sufficient post-construction guidance for all water resources; and (2) ensuring a sustainable supply of adequate safe water in households.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)977-990
Number of pages14
JournalWater Policy
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

household income
rainwater
water
health
health risk
water supply
household expenditure
water management
expenditures
quality of life
water availability
dehydration
multiple regression
expenditure
harvest
savings
regression analysis
Uganda
developing world
water resource

Keywords

  • Computers
  • Health
  • Quality of life
  • Savings
  • Vendors
  • Water shortage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Safe water, household income and health challenges in Ugandan homes that harvest rainwater. / Baguma, David; Hashim, Jamal H.; Syed Junid, Syed Mohamed Al-Junid; Hauser, Michael; Jung, Helmut; Loiskandl, Willibald.

In: Water Policy, Vol. 14, No. 6, 2012, p. 977-990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baguma, David ; Hashim, Jamal H. ; Syed Junid, Syed Mohamed Al-Junid ; Hauser, Michael ; Jung, Helmut ; Loiskandl, Willibald. / Safe water, household income and health challenges in Ugandan homes that harvest rainwater. In: Water Policy. 2012 ; Vol. 14, No. 6. pp. 977-990.
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