Role of laparoscopy in the management of recurrent abdominal pain in children

H. L. Tan, J. M. Smart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recurrent abdominal pain is a very common problem in childhood. While the pains are usually non-organic in nature, there remains a small but significant group of patients in whom it is difficult to exclude surgical pathology. These groups have in the past been considered for exploratory laparotomy. We investigated the role of diagnostic laparoscopy in the management of these patients and report our experience. Fifteen patients presented with recurrent pain in the right iliac fossa where symptoms were sufficient to interfere with lifestyle. All patients underwent diagnostic laparoscopy and laparoscopic appendicectomy. Appendiceal faecoliths were identified in four patients and histological evidence of previous inflammation was documented in four others. One patient had appendiceal adhesions with a histologically normal appendix. The remaining six patients had had no appendiceal or any other pathology. Nine other patients who had open surgery previously also underwent diagnostic laparoscopy for recurrent abdominal pain. Six patients were found to have adhesions that were successfully lysed laparoscopically with subsequent relief of symptoms. Three patients re-presented with further abdominal pain within four to 14 months. Our early experience with diagnostic laparoscopy suggests that it is a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in the management of recurrent abdominal pain during childhood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-50
Number of pages4
JournalAsian Journal of Surgery
Volume21
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Laparoscopy
Abdominal Pain
Pain
Surgical Pathology
Laparotomy
Life Style
Pathology
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Role of laparoscopy in the management of recurrent abdominal pain in children. / Tan, H. L.; Smart, J. M.

In: Asian Journal of Surgery, Vol. 21, No. 1, 1998, p. 47-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tan, H. L. ; Smart, J. M. / Role of laparoscopy in the management of recurrent abdominal pain in children. In: Asian Journal of Surgery. 1998 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 47-50.
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