Risk factors for endemic giardiasis: highlighting the possible association of contaminated water and food

A. K. Mohammed Mahdy, Y. A L Lim, Johari Surin, Kiew Lian Wan, M. S Hesham Al-Mekhlafi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was conducted to reassess the risk factors for giardiasis in communities of the Orang Asli (indigenous people) in Pahang, Malaysia. Stool samples were collected from 321 individuals (2-76 years old; 160 males, 161 females). Data were collected via laboratory analysis of faecal samples and a pre-tested standard questionnaire. River water samples were tested for Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts. The overall prevalence of G. intestinalis infection was 23.7%. Children ≤12 years old had the highest infection rate and have been identified as a high risk group (odds ratio (OR) = 6.2, 95% CI 1.5-27.0, P < 0.005). The risk of getting giardiasis also appeared to be significantly associated with drinking piped water (OR = 5.1, 95% CI 0.06-0.7, P < 0.005) and eating raw vegetables (OR = 2.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.6, P < 0.005). In conclusion, sociodemographic factors have always been associated with the high prevalence of Giardia infections in Malaysia. However, the present study also highlights the need to look into the possibility of other risks such as water and food transmission routes. In future, it is necessary that these two aspects be considered in control strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)465-470
Number of pages6
JournalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume102
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2008

Fingerprint

Giardiasis
Giardia
Malaysia
Odds Ratio
Food
Water
Infection
Cryptosporidium
Oocysts
Rivers
Drinking Water
Vegetables
Cysts
Eating

Keywords

  • Foodborne disease
  • Giardia intestinalis
  • Giardiasis
  • Malaysia
  • Risk factors
  • Waterborne disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Risk factors for endemic giardiasis : highlighting the possible association of contaminated water and food. / Mohammed Mahdy, A. K.; Lim, Y. A L; Surin, Johari; Wan, Kiew Lian; Al-Mekhlafi, M. S Hesham.

In: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 102, No. 5, 05.2008, p. 465-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mohammed Mahdy, A. K. ; Lim, Y. A L ; Surin, Johari ; Wan, Kiew Lian ; Al-Mekhlafi, M. S Hesham. / Risk factors for endemic giardiasis : highlighting the possible association of contaminated water and food. In: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2008 ; Vol. 102, No. 5. pp. 465-470.
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