Risk factors associated with umbilical vascular catheter-associated thrombosis in newborn infants

N. Y. Boo, N. C. Wong, Syed Zulkifli Syed Zakaria, M. S. Lye

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Abstract

Objective: To determine the risk factors associated with umbilical vascular catheter-associated thrombosis. Methods: All consecutive inborn infants with umbilical arterial (UAC) and/or umbilical venous catheters (UVC) inserted for more than 6 h duration were included in the study. Each infant was screened for thrombosis in the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava by 2-D abdominal ultrasonography within 48-72 h of insertion of umbilical vascular catheters. Subsequent serial scanning was performed at intervals of every 5-7 days, and within 48 h after removal of catheters. Results: Upon removal of umbilical catheters, abdominal aortic thrombi were detected in 32/99 (32.3%) infants with UAC. Small thrombi were detected in the inferior vena cava of 2/49 (4.1%) infants with UVC (one of whom had both UAC and UVC). When compared with those who received only UVC (n = 18), infants who received either UAC alone (n = 68) or both UAC and UVC (n = 31) had significantly higher risk of developing thrombosis (odds ratio (OR): 7.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 325.5)). Logistic regression analysis of various potential risk factors showed that the only significant risk factor associated with the development of abdominal aortic thrombosis following insertion of UAC was longer duration of UAC in situ (for every additional day of UAC in situ, adjusted OR of developing thrombosis was: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.3; P = 0.002). Conclusion: Umbilical arterial catheter-associated thrombosis was common. Umbilical arterial catheter should be removed as soon as possible when not needed. Upon removal of UAC, all infants should be screened for abdominal aortic thrombus by 2-D ultrasonography.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)460-465
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Umbilicus
Vascular Access Devices
Thrombosis
Newborn Infant
Catheters
Inferior Vena Cava
Ultrasonography
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Abdominal Aorta
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Duration
  • Neonates
  • Thrombosis
  • Umbilical catheters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Risk factors associated with umbilical vascular catheter-associated thrombosis in newborn infants. / Boo, N. Y.; Wong, N. C.; Syed Zakaria, Syed Zulkifli; Lye, M. S.

In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, Vol. 35, No. 5, 1999, p. 460-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To determine the risk factors associated with umbilical vascular catheter-associated thrombosis. Methods: All consecutive inborn infants with umbilical arterial (UAC) and/or umbilical venous catheters (UVC) inserted for more than 6 h duration were included in the study. Each infant was screened for thrombosis in the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava by 2-D abdominal ultrasonography within 48-72 h of insertion of umbilical vascular catheters. Subsequent serial scanning was performed at intervals of every 5-7 days, and within 48 h after removal of catheters. Results: Upon removal of umbilical catheters, abdominal aortic thrombi were detected in 32/99 (32.3{\%}) infants with UAC. Small thrombi were detected in the inferior vena cava of 2/49 (4.1{\%}) infants with UVC (one of whom had both UAC and UVC). When compared with those who received only UVC (n = 18), infants who received either UAC alone (n = 68) or both UAC and UVC (n = 31) had significantly higher risk of developing thrombosis (odds ratio (OR): 7.6, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 325.5)). Logistic regression analysis of various potential risk factors showed that the only significant risk factor associated with the development of abdominal aortic thrombosis following insertion of UAC was longer duration of UAC in situ (for every additional day of UAC in situ, adjusted OR of developing thrombosis was: 1.2, 95{\%} CI: 1.1, 1.3; P = 0.002). Conclusion: Umbilical arterial catheter-associated thrombosis was common. Umbilical arterial catheter should be removed as soon as possible when not needed. Upon removal of UAC, all infants should be screened for abdominal aortic thrombus by 2-D ultrasonography.",
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N2 - Objective: To determine the risk factors associated with umbilical vascular catheter-associated thrombosis. Methods: All consecutive inborn infants with umbilical arterial (UAC) and/or umbilical venous catheters (UVC) inserted for more than 6 h duration were included in the study. Each infant was screened for thrombosis in the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava by 2-D abdominal ultrasonography within 48-72 h of insertion of umbilical vascular catheters. Subsequent serial scanning was performed at intervals of every 5-7 days, and within 48 h after removal of catheters. Results: Upon removal of umbilical catheters, abdominal aortic thrombi were detected in 32/99 (32.3%) infants with UAC. Small thrombi were detected in the inferior vena cava of 2/49 (4.1%) infants with UVC (one of whom had both UAC and UVC). When compared with those who received only UVC (n = 18), infants who received either UAC alone (n = 68) or both UAC and UVC (n = 31) had significantly higher risk of developing thrombosis (odds ratio (OR): 7.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 325.5)). Logistic regression analysis of various potential risk factors showed that the only significant risk factor associated with the development of abdominal aortic thrombosis following insertion of UAC was longer duration of UAC in situ (for every additional day of UAC in situ, adjusted OR of developing thrombosis was: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.3; P = 0.002). Conclusion: Umbilical arterial catheter-associated thrombosis was common. Umbilical arterial catheter should be removed as soon as possible when not needed. Upon removal of UAC, all infants should be screened for abdominal aortic thrombus by 2-D ultrasonography.

AB - Objective: To determine the risk factors associated with umbilical vascular catheter-associated thrombosis. Methods: All consecutive inborn infants with umbilical arterial (UAC) and/or umbilical venous catheters (UVC) inserted for more than 6 h duration were included in the study. Each infant was screened for thrombosis in the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava by 2-D abdominal ultrasonography within 48-72 h of insertion of umbilical vascular catheters. Subsequent serial scanning was performed at intervals of every 5-7 days, and within 48 h after removal of catheters. Results: Upon removal of umbilical catheters, abdominal aortic thrombi were detected in 32/99 (32.3%) infants with UAC. Small thrombi were detected in the inferior vena cava of 2/49 (4.1%) infants with UVC (one of whom had both UAC and UVC). When compared with those who received only UVC (n = 18), infants who received either UAC alone (n = 68) or both UAC and UVC (n = 31) had significantly higher risk of developing thrombosis (odds ratio (OR): 7.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 325.5)). Logistic regression analysis of various potential risk factors showed that the only significant risk factor associated with the development of abdominal aortic thrombosis following insertion of UAC was longer duration of UAC in situ (for every additional day of UAC in situ, adjusted OR of developing thrombosis was: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.3; P = 0.002). Conclusion: Umbilical arterial catheter-associated thrombosis was common. Umbilical arterial catheter should be removed as soon as possible when not needed. Upon removal of UAC, all infants should be screened for abdominal aortic thrombus by 2-D ultrasonography.

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KW - Umbilical catheters

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